Posted on February 09, 2015 * Comments

Reading over comments from part 1, it seems most of you did pretty well. I was also delighted to hear from one teacher whose AP biology students all scored 100%.

Posted on February 03, 2015 * Comments

Headline: Bill Deny: Science GuyNow, we all know that air pressure is a function of the atmospheric conditions, it’s a function of that. So, if there’s activity in the ball relative to the rubbing process[…] So the atmospheric conditions as well as the true equilibrium of the football is critical to the measurement. …

Posted on February 03, 2015 * Comments

Asked to contribute to the recent “How Stupid Not to Have Thought of That!” series here at the Science League of America, Warren D. Allmon took a different tack, choosing to write about a theme in Darwin’s work that is too often overlooked: the importance of “vestiges” as evidence for evolution. Allmon is the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution in Ithaca, New York, and the Hunter R. Rawlings III Professor of Paleontology in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University.

Posted on February 02, 2015 * Comments

Groundhog Day poster (1993)On this Groundhog Day, I found myself thinking about the Harold Ramis/Bill Murray classic film of the same name, and the dangerous way that climate change policy has been stuck in a loop.

Posted on February 02, 2015 * Comments

I wrote my first Misconception Monday post seven months ago. I admit that I was hoping for something more poetic like six months or even nine (the length of a school year), but as we all learned in Harry Potter, seven is the most magical number, so I’m going to go with it. What is “it,” you rightly ask? A test! I’m totally going to test you to see how much you have learned! And I’m super excited about it, I won’t lie. (Between this feeling of total joy at the thought of a test and my absolute giddiness at entering a Staples store, I sometimes question my decision not to be a teacher.)

Posted on February 02, 2015 * Comments

I’ve been thinking about confrontational activist strategies lately, and when they do and don’t work. In a previous post, I discussed some ways that confrontation doesn’t work. Here I want to explore the ways that confrontation can succeed.

Posted on January 30, 2015 * Comments

Last month when I ended "Fossil Friday", I promised I would create a new regular feature where we could dish on some issues close to NCSE's heart, such as evolution, climate change, education and, surprise, surprise science denial!