Posted on February 02, 2015 * Comments

Groundhog Day poster (1993)On this Groundhog Day, I found myself thinking about the Harold Ramis/Bill Murray classic film of the same name, and the dangerous way that climate change policy has been stuck in a loop.

Posted on February 02, 2015 * Comments

I wrote my first Misconception Monday post seven months ago. I admit that I was hoping for something more poetic like six months or even nine (the length of a school year), but as we all learned in Harry Potter, seven is the most magical number, so I’m going to go with it. What is “it,” you rightly ask? A test! I’m totally going to test you to see how much you have learned! And I’m super excited about it, I won’t lie. (Between this feeling of total joy at the thought of a test and my absolute giddiness at entering a Staples store, I sometimes question my decision not to be a teacher.)

Posted on February 02, 2015 * Comments

I’ve been thinking about confrontational activist strategies lately, and when they do and don’t work. In a previous post, I discussed some ways that confrontation doesn’t work. Here I want to explore the ways that confrontation can succeed.

Posted on January 30, 2015 * Comments

Last month when I ended "Fossil Friday", I promised I would create a new regular feature where we could dish on some issues close to NCSE's heart, such as evolution, climate change, education and, surprise, surprise science denial! 

Posted on January 29, 2015 * Comments

I’ve been thinking about the ethics and benefits of confrontational activist strategies lately. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday remembrance, amid the ongoing protests over police abuses in Ferguson and elsewhere, shaped those thoughts, as does NCSE’s success using non-confrontational approaches, as well as some confrontations that have backfired.

Posted on January 29, 2015 * Comments

The title page of Vernon Kellogg's Headquarters Nights

When I was writing not so long ago about the enigmatic figure of the Gentleman with a Duster—whose animadversions on Darwinism in the preface to the American edition of The Glass of Fashion (1921) were invoked by Arthur I. Brown and William Jennings Bryan—I quoted the Gentleman as complaining that Darwinism “justifies Prussianism at the cannon, and Bolshevism at the prison-door.”

Posted on January 28, 2015 * Comments

Herman Mays is a member of NCSE and a biology professor at Marshall University. He testified at the West Virginia Board of Education meeting last week, speaking against climate change-denying revisions to the state’s science standards. Thanks to outcry from concerned scientists and parents like Mays, the board voted to remove the climate change denial. We asked him to describe what happened at the hearing, and what motivated him to speak out. A longer account of his visit with the state board will appear in a future issue of Reports of the NCSE.

Posted on January 27, 2015 * Comments

What’s it going to take for science writers to understand that there is no need in evolution? Think I could get Tom Hanks to do a PSA for me? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6M8szlSa-8o

Posted on January 27, 2015 * Comments

Huxley in a dunce cap

“How extremely stupid not to have thought of that!” was Thomas Henry Huxley’s reflection on reading Darwin’s Origin of Species. What might elicit such a reaction from a contemporary biologist? Today the question is answered by Douglas J. Futuyma, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University.

Posted on January 26, 2015 * Comments

The New York Times recently ran an interesting article by Adam Frank titled “Is Climate Disaster Inevitable?” This piece posed an intriguing answer to this puzzling question: Where are all the extraterrestrials?

ufo