Posted on April 10, 2014 * Comments

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Taner Edis. Professor of Physics at Truman State University, Edis is also interested in the creationism-evolution controversy in the Islamic world, which he discusses in a number of articles as well as in his book An Illusion of Harmony: Science and Religion in Islam (2007).

Posted on April 08, 2014 * Comments

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Ronald L. Numbers, the Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Numbers is the author of The Creationists (1992; expanded edition 2006) as well as Darwinism Comes to America (1998).

Posted on April 08, 2014 * Comments

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

Because 2014 is the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, there’s been a lot of discussion of the causes, conduct, and consequences of the war lately.

Posted on April 08, 2014 * Comments

Last week on Fossil Friday, my expectations were high. I gave you a single tooth and expected you to determine the entire animal once attached to it!

And you were all champs. Every commenter (except for Mr. Sloth man), got it right, correctly identifying the tooth as belonging to a mosasaur, a group of large extinct marine reptiles. 

From Oceans of Kansas:

Posted on April 08, 2014 * Comments
The Milky Way in many wavelengths. Image via NASA, showing how the Milky Way appears in different parts of the spectrum.
The Milky Way in many wavelengths. Image via NASA, showing how the Milky Way appears in different parts of the spectrum, a theme explored in the "Hidden in the Light" episode of Cosmos.
Posted on April 07, 2014 * Comments

Ah, California living. Land of fruits and nuts. And fungi. Impressed one day by the unusually high number of kinds of mushrooms at my local produce store (I stopped counting at 25), I posted a picture of the array on my Facebook page. Whereupon Jim Strickland waggishly warned me about using the term “kinds”, a taxonomic term of creationists that fails to map onto any actual scientific taxonomic system.

Posted on April 04, 2014 * Comments

Tauriel: Wood elves love best the light of the stars.
Fili: I always thought it is a cold light, remote and far away.
Tauriel: It is memory, precious and pure.

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

Posted on April 04, 2014 * Comments

This week on Fossil Friday, I bring you a fossil that you can really sink your teeth into! Or maybe this animal would have sunk its teeth into you!

This air-breathing marine reptile dates back to the Jurassic and was found in what is now the Sahara Desert. Although they are considered to be a distant relative of the Komodo Dragon, researchers now think they are even more closely related to snakes.

Posted on April 03, 2014 * Comments

William Paley died in 1805, and there’s no reason that his shade should be haunting me. And yet he appears even in my leisure reading.