Posted on June 26, 2014 * Comments

William Jennings Bryan (1902)

In a so far successful effort to avoid having to unpack a bunch of boxes that are cluttering my office at the moment, I’m talking about four scientists cited in a footnote in William Jennings Bryan’s In His Image (1922), evidently to support Bryan’s assertion, “If Darwin had described his doctrine as a guess instead of calling it an hypothesis, it would not have lived a year.”

Posted on June 24, 2014 * Comments

Did former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former Treasury Secretary and Goldman Sachs CEO Hank Paulson, and retired hedge fund-turned climate action advocate Tom Styer–the three musketeers behind the just-published Risky Business report–ever see the 1983 movie Risky Business?

Posted on June 24, 2014 * Comments

William Jennings Bryan (1902)

Recall, from part 1, that I’m discussing four scientists cited in a footnote in William Jennings Bryan’s In His Image (1922), evidently to support Bryan’s assertion, “If Darwin had described his doctrine as a guess instead of calling it an hypothesis, it would not have lived a year.” Three of them were reasonably familiar to me.

Posted on June 24, 2014 * Comments

Illustration by Karen Lewis. Copyright Grandmother Fish, used by permission. In the past few weeks, I’ve had the opportunity to review and comment on what seems to be a very unusual if not unique venture—a “first book of evolution” designed for children in the toddler to preschool age range. This is Grandmother Fish (referred to NCSE by Phil Plait, the Bad Astronomer), which you can read about here

Posted on June 23, 2014 * Comments

Last week on Fossil Friday, I presented some not-so-tiny toes with some pretty big hints. I said that the fossil was found in what is now Utah, and it dates back to the Jurassic. There was a lot of debate in the comments section, including a  discussion of dinosaur gang colors (I don't want to know...)

Posted on June 23, 2014 * Comments

With Cosmos’ thirteenth episode, “Unafraid of the Dark,” Neil deGrasse Tyson brings to conclusion his extraordinary re-imagining of Carl Sagan’s groundbreaking series. Tyson’s brilliant presentations, rich in detail while always clear and comprehensible, have done a great service to the public understanding of science. Over the last few months, the intellectual wasteland of American popular culture was briefly illuminated with this surprising display of science.

Posted on June 20, 2014 * Comments

This week on the Fossil Friday. I answer a special request from last week’s winner, Gerald Wilgus. Gerald thought we’ve had too many invertebrates lately, and maybe we should throw the vertebrate people a bone—no pun intended!

Posted on June 19, 2014 * Comments

William Jennings Bryan (1902)

There are probably better motivations for reading William Jennings Bryan’s In His Image (1922) than wanting to avoid unpacking boxes, but needs must when the devil drives.

Posted on June 18, 2014 * Comments

This post was written by Stephanie Keep and Peter Hess.