Posted on December 30, 2015 * Comments

Cover of Powell, Four Revolutions in the Earth Sciences

Steven Dutch continues his review of James L. Powell’s Four Revolutions in the Earth Sciences (2015), which began with part 1 and continued in part 2.

Posted on December 30, 2015 * Comments

William Hanna Thompson

Perhaps I begin to sound like a broken phonograph, but I find that chapter 28—“Scientists Condemn Evolution”—of William A. Williams’s The Evolution of Man Scientifically Disproved (1925) is the gift that keeps on giving. (The phrase, I find, was originally a marketing slogan for a phonograph, so there you go.) That chapter is chockablock with a lot of quotations from various scientific authorities. As it happens, I’ve already blogged here at the Science League of America about a number of them: including Lionel S. BealeAlbert Fleischmann (misspelled “Fleishman” by Williams), St. George Mivart (misspelled “Mivert” by Williams), Ernst HaeckelNathaniel S. Shaler (although Williams didn’t misattribute his words to Darwin), Oscar Fraas (misspelled “Traas” by Williams), and, most recently, Thomas Henry Huxley. And now it’s the turn of W. H. Thompson.

Posted on December 29, 2015 * Comments

Cover of Powell, Four Revolutions in the Earth Sciences

Steven Dutch continues his review of James L. Powell’s Four Revolutions in the Earth Sciences (2015), which began with part 1.

Posted on December 28, 2015 * Comments

Cover of Powell, Four Revolutions in the Earth Sciences

James L. Powell’s Four Revolutions in the Earth Sciences (2015) is an excellent book that reviews four geoscience revolutions: accurate geologic dating techniques, the theory of plate tectonics, the discovery of an era-ending meteor impact, and the advent of anthropogenic climate change. Far too many histories of science these days rely on secondary materials and repeat urban legends. This book relies heavily on original sources. I would gladly use this book in a course on the history of geology.

Posted on December 28, 2015 * Comments

Whose snout is this?

This, this is Diplocaulus
A lepospondyl amphibian
Praise, praise, praise to Ron Pine:
He won himself the blue ribbon.

Posted on December 25, 2015 * Comments

Houghton Mifflin and Company’s Holiday Books for MDCCCXCV, via Wikimedia Commons

Posted on December 25, 2015 * Comments

Whose snout is this?

Whose snout is this, from Permian days,
On your computer is showing?
Submit your guess (ten words or less)
If you believe you are knowing.

Posted on December 24, 2015 * Comments

Stunning! Interactive! Engaging! Creationist!

Posted on December 23, 2015 * Comments

Wedding rings. Licensed CC-BY-2.0 by Jeff Belmonte, via Wikimedia Commons.Wedding bells are ringing in Seattle, Washington, and Richardson, Texas: the Discovery Institute and the Foundation for Thought and Ethics are getting hitched! They’ve had a long and surprisingly secretive courtship, but we at NCSE are glad to see these crazy kids doing the honest thing.