Posted on June 06, 2014 * Comments

Science and Religion: One Planet, Many Possibilities

When part 1 of “Intelligent Design in Public Schools” ended, I was in the middle of summarizing my essay of the same title that was published in Whitney A. Bauman and Lucas F. Johnston’s collection Science and Religion: One Planet, Many Possibilities (Routledge 2014). Where was I?

Posted on June 05, 2014 * Comments

 

 

In reading about the hoopla and choreography around the new EPA power plant regulations and thinking about the “teachable moments” the new regs offer, I can’t help but wonder: Would the situation today be different if we’d included human impact on the climate system—the causes, effects, risks and possible responses—in science education over the past 50 years?

Posted on June 04, 2014 * Comments

Science and Religion: One Planet, Many Possibilities

It’s nice to be asked to write something, and it’s especially nice to be asked to write something in your field of expertise, and it’s nicest of all to be asked to write something when the people who ask you know exactly what they want. So when Whitney A. Bauman of Florida International University’s Department of Religious Studies and Lucas F. Johnston of Wake Forest College’s Department of Religion asked me to write a piece on “intelligent design” in public schools for their collection Science and Religion: One Planet, Many Possibilities (Routledge 2014), I was delighted to do so.

Posted on June 02, 2014 * Comments

The Cosmos series is drawing to a close, and in Sunday's penultimate episode, “The World Set Free,” Neil deGrasse Tyson delved deeply into a topic touched upon in almost every episode so far: climate change.

the world set free

Posted on June 02, 2014 * Comments


Photo Credit: PeterThoeny via Compfight cc  

Posted on May 30, 2014 * Comments

In late 2012, GQ magazine asked Florida’s Senator Marco Rubio, “How old do you think the Earth is?”

He answered “4.55 billion years” and no one ever talked about it again.

Posted on May 30, 2014 * Comments

Sunday the 18th's episode of Cosmos begins with the flood myth (the Babylonian version featuring Gilgamesh, not the gritty reboot with Noah). Thereafter, Neil deGrasse Tyson takes us to the early Earth, asks how the first life arrived on our planet, and speculates about how life might move between planets and even galaxies. And then he addresses the present and the future with a meditation on how civilizations rise and fall.

Posted on May 30, 2014 * Comments

This week's fossil is one that everyone should recognize. Though this one dates back to the Miocene, it is a delicacy people still enjoy today, myself included! It may look like a footprint or even a sloth coprolite (that's a fancy word for fossilized poop), but no, it was probably as tasty then as it is now. What was this little creature? Where was the fossil found?

First person to identify it gets bragging rights for the week!