Texas

11.14.2014

"Climate scientists can breathe a bit easier," the National Journal (November 13, 2014) reports. "Pearson Education — the largest educational publisher in the world — has cut material from a proposed Texas social-studies textbook that cast doubt on the human causes of global warming."

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The latest battle over Texas textbooks is coming to a head. Next week, the state board of education will vote to adopt social studies textbooks, setting the list of books approved for use in history, geography, social studies, economics, and other classes for next decade. Normally we at NCSE don’t spend much time looking at social studies textbooks, but climate change comes up in several of the books and we looked them over to make sure the science was right.

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11.13.2014

The pressure on the Texas board of education to require the correction of errors in the coverage of climate change in social studies textbooks presently under consideration continues.

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11.07.2014

Writing in the Austin American-Statesman (November 6, 2014), Camille Parmesan and Alan I. Leshner called on the Texas state board of education to insist on the correction of scientifically inaccurate material about climate change in social studies textbooks currently under consideration for state adoption. "Texas educators should reject the new textbooks unless they are edited to address the serious concerns outlined by the National Center for Science Education," they argued.

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“I’d like a Biblical check on that.”

Those were the first words I heard upon logging into Monday’s working session of the Texas board of education. The board was meeting with publishers to discuss revisions to social studies textbooks, in preparation for the final adoption vote on November 21.

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10.20.2014

Over 24,000 Texans have signed petitions calling on the Texas board of education to require the correction of errors in the coverage of climate change in social studies textbooks presently under consideration.

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10.01.2014

NCSE's Josh Rosenau and Mark McCaffrey were invited by the Houston Chronicle (September 30, 2014) to discuss the controversy over the treatment of climate science in social studies textbooks now under consideration by the Texas state board of education. 

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09.17.2014

When the Texas state board of education held a hearing on September 16, 2014, on social studies textbooks submitted for state adoption, the treatment of climate science was among the topics. 

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09.15.2014

"An examination of how proposed social studies textbooks for Texas public schools address climate change reveals distortions and bias that misrepresent the broad scientific consensus on the phenomenon," charged the Texas Freedom Network and the National Center for Science Education in a joint press release issued on September 15, 2014.

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01.21.2014

"When public-school students enrolled in Texas’[s] largest charter program open their biology workbooks, they will read that the fossil record is 'sketchy.' That evolution is 'dogma' and an 'unproved theory' with no experimental basis. They will be told that leading scientists dispute the mechanisms of evolution and the age of the Earth," according to Zack Kopplin, writing in Slate (January 16, 2014). "These are all lies."

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