National

12.06.2013

NCSE is pleased to announce the second of a new series of on-line workshops aimed at broadening and deepening the networks that make our work possible. The workshop focuses on lobbying policymakers — legislators, members of state boards of education, members of local school boards, and the like — and features NCSE's Josh Rosenau, the ACLU's Dena Sher, and Oklahomans for Excellence in Science Education's Vic Hutchison.

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11.21.2013

What can citizens like you do to respond when science education comes under attack? How can you and other concerned citizens organize to fight back? What can you do to prevent attacks on science education in your community? NCSE is pleased to announce the first of a new series of on-line workshops aimed at broadening and deepening the networks that make our work possible. The workshop begins at 3:00 p.m. Pacific time (6:00 p.m. Eastern time) on November 25, 2013, and spaces are still available, so register now!

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11.04.2013

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"Two-thirds of Americans (67%) say there is solid evidence that the earth has been getting warmer over the last few decades, a figure that has changed little in the past few years," according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

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10.09.2013

“You seem to be traveling all the time” is a comment I get a lot. I don’t actually travel all the time, but some months are busier than others. Some of my travel is to give presentations, which are listed with all NCSE staff and board member presentations here. When a staff member gives a talk somewhere, the office will usually send out a notice to NCSE members in the area, in case they wish to attend.

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Since the start of the government shutdown, my Facebook feed has been filled with nothing but politics. Everyone has an opinion about what is going on and who is responsible. This response was of course expected, but what surprised me was that almost immediately, intertwined with the political commentary, was a flurry of distressed posts from my scientist friends. “Ack! I can’t reach this dataset that was hosted on a government website, how can I do my research?” and “the NSF’s website is down, how can I apply for that grant?” became common themes throughout the day.

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10.01.2013

Are you concerned about the integrity of science education in the United States? Are you worried about efforts to undermine the teaching of evolution and climate change? Are you willing to work with your neighbors to defend and improve the quality of science education in formal and informal education?

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09.20.2013

The Darwin Day Roadshow is returning! The Roadshow is a project of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, in which NESCent staff shares their enthusiasm for evolutionary science with students, teachers, and the general public on the occasion of Charles Darwin's birthday, February 12.

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I’m always on the lookout—or should I say on the listen?—for material to add to Voices for Evolution, NCSE’s compilation of statements supporting the teaching of evolution and opposing attempts to undermine it. In the most recent edition, published in 2008, there were no fewer than 176 such statements, from a wide range of scientific, educational, civil liberties, and religious and freethought organizations.

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I am not the average American.

It isn't that I needed the most recent report from the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication to tell me that. But the results of their survey of how Americans communicate about climate change adds to the evidence.

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On a vacation trip, I had a morning to kill in Atlanta before catching my plane, and a friend suggested we visit the Jimmy Carter Presidential Museum. Sounded good. I always admired Carter, and even many of his detractors admit he is one of the most admirable past-presidents, spending his time on good works, rather than enriching himself with large lecture fees.

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