National

12.21.2001
The Elementary and Secondary Education Authorization Act which is headed for the President's signature does not contain the antievolution "Santorum amendment", though there is brief mention of the topic of evolution in explanatory materials appended to the law. The good news for teachers is that they will not have to teach evolution any differently as a result of the new legislation.

Background

Since the summer of 2001, a joint Senate-House conference committee has attempted to resolve the House and Senate versions of the Elementary and
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10.22.2001
Representatives of nearly one hundred scientific societies and organizations have signed a letter asking Congress not to adopt the "Santorum Amendment" as part of the revised Elementary and Secondary Education Act now under consideration. The letter asks the House-Senate conference committee to remove a Senate resolution, sponsored by Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, which singles out evolution as a controversial theory.
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06.13.2001
On June 13, 2001, the US Senate adopted a "Sense of the Senate" amendment to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Authorization bill, S.1, currently under consideration. The resolution (Amendment #799) read:

"It is the sense of the Senate that (1) good science education should prepare students to distinguish the data or testable theories of science from philosophical or religious claims that are made in the name of science; and
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