National

04.30.2002
Lawrence Krauss, chair of the Physics Department at Case Western Reserve University, and recent recipient of the American Association for Advancement of Science Award for Public Understanding of Science, appears in the April 30, 2002, New York Times.

In the editorial Krauss takes aim at believers in UFOs, young-earth creationism, and advocates of intelligent design.
See the New York Times.
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03.21.2002
In response to Senator Rick Santorum's March 14 op-ed piece in the Washington Times, which implied that Senator Edward Kennedy approved of teaching "intelligent design" in public school science classes, Kennedy explained in a March 21, 2002, letter to the Times that he does not; "intelligent design," he said, "is not a genuine scientific theory." The complete text of his letter:
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12.21.2001
The Elementary and Secondary Education Authorization Act which is headed for the President's signature does not contain the antievolution "Santorum amendment", though there is brief mention of the topic of evolution in explanatory materials appended to the law. The good news for teachers is that they will not have to teach evolution any differently as a result of the new legislation.

Background

Since the summer of 2001, a joint Senate-House conference committee has attempted to resolve the House and Senate versions of the Elementary and
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10.22.2001
Representatives of nearly one hundred scientific societies and organizations have signed a letter asking Congress not to adopt the "Santorum Amendment" as part of the revised Elementary and Secondary Education Act now under consideration. The letter asks the House-Senate conference committee to remove a Senate resolution, sponsored by Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, which singles out evolution as a controversial theory.
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06.13.2001
On June 13, 2001, the US Senate adopted a "Sense of the Senate" amendment to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Authorization bill, S.1, currently under consideration. The resolution (Amendment #799) read:

"It is the sense of the Senate that (1) good science education should prepare students to distinguish the data or testable theories of science from philosophical or religious claims that are made in the name of science; and
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