Louisiana

06.13.2018

Senate Concurrent Resolution 17 (PDF), introduced in the Louisiana Senate on May 29, 2018, would, if passed, have commended a former state senator "on his support and endorsement of teaching creationism in public schools."

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05.21.2018

When the Louisiana state legislature adjourned sine die on May 18, 2018, Senate Resolution 33 (PDF), which would have commended a former state senator "on his support and endorsement of teaching creationism in public schools," died.

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03.22.2018

Senate Resolution 33 (PDF), introduced in the Louisiana Senate on March 20, 2018, would, if passed, commend a former state senator "on his support and endorsement of teaching creationism in public schools."

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06.08.2017

NCSE is pleased to announce that the text of William J. Bennetta's "The Rise and Fall of the Louisiana Creationist Law" — a two-part article that appeared in the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's magazine Terra in 1988 — is now available on NCSE's website, courtesy of the author and the museum.

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03.08.2017

Louisiana's state board of elementary and secondary education voted to adopt a new set of state science standards on March 8, 2017, according to the Baton Rouge Advocate (March 8, 2017) — but not without a nod in the general direction of creationism.

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07.14.2016

Barbara ForrestWriting in the Baton Rouge Advocate (July 7, 2016), Barbara Forrest rebutted a series of misleading claims about the so-called Louisiana Science Education Act of 2008.

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A scan of the Baton Rouge Advocate article showing the text subsequently revisedState Senator Dan Claitor (R–District 16) is leading an effort in Louisiana to repeal various outdated laws on its books. In a recent report on these efforts, there’s an interesting comment from radical cleric Gene Mills.

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03.30.2016

Louisiana's Senate Bill 156 (PDF), which would have repealed the state's Balanced Treatment for  Creation-Science and Evolution-Science Act, was rejected on a 4-2 vote in the Senate Education Committee on March 29, 2016, according to the Associated Press (March 29, 2016).

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03.14.2016

Louisiana's Senate Bill 156 (PDF) would, if enacted, repeal the state's Balanced Treatment for Creation-Science and Evolution-Science Act, which was enacted in 1981 and declared to be unconstitutional by the United States Supreme Court in Edwards v. Aguillard in 1987. 

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07.22.2015

Adrian Duplantier. Photo via United States District Court, Eastern District of Louisiana.

Prompted by his unlikely appearance, bragging of his youthful exploits eating oysters, in Jason Fagone’s Horsemen of the Esophagus (2006), a book on competitive eating that I happened to be reading, I’m discussing Adrian Duplantier (1929–2007), in particular his role in the legal history of the creationism/evolution conflict. (I’m not really all that interested in competitive eating, after all, although I recommend Fagone’s book.) As explained in part 1, Duplantier was the district court judge who oversaw Aguillard et al. v. Treen et al., the case that eventually produced Edwards et al. v. Aguillard et al., the 1987 Supreme Court case that established the unconstitutionality of teaching creationism in the public schools. At issue in the case was the constitutionality of Louisiana’s Balanced Treatment for Creation-Science and Evolution-Science in Public School Instruction Act, enacted in 1981. But, as it turns out, there was a competing lawsuit, which delayed—and indeed threatened to derail—Aguillard v. Treen.

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