Legislation

03.06.2017

Two bills in the Iowa legislature that would have undermined the integrity of science education died on March 3, 2017, when a deadline for bills to pass committee in their house of origin expired.

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03.03.2017

Iowa's House File 480, introduced and referred to the House Education Committee on March 1, 2017, would, if enacted, require teachers in Iowa's public schools to include "opposing points of view or beliefs" to accompany any instruction relating to evolution, the origins of life, global warming, or human cloning.

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02.28.2017

Indiana's Senate Resolution 17, which targets the teaching of evolution in Indiana's public schools, was passed on a 40-9 vote by the Senate on February 27, 2017. 

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02.27.2017

Idaho's Senate Education Committee voted, on party lines, to delete five standards — those discussing climate change and human impact on the environment — from a proposed new set of state science standards for Idaho on February 27, 2017, according to Idaho Ed News (February 27, 2017).

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02.27.2017

Oklahoma's Senate Bill 393 (PDF), which would empower science denial in the classroom, was passed on a 13-1 vote by the Senate Education Committee on February 27, 2017.

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02.24.2017

A pair of bills introduced in the Florida legislature — House Bill 989 and Senate Bill 1210 — are ostensibly aimed at empowering taxpayers to object to the use of specific instructional materials in the public schools, for example on the grounds that they fail to provide "a noninflammatory, objective, and balanced viewpoint on issues." There is reason to believe that evolution and climate change are among the targets.

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02.24.2017

Indiana's Senate Resolution 17, which targets the teaching of evolution in Indiana's public schools, was passed on a 7-3 vote by the Senate Committee on Education and Career Development on February 22, 2017. 

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02.22.2017

South Dakota's Senate Bill 55, which would have empowered science denial in the classroom, was defeated in the House Education Committee on February 22, 2017. 

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02.15.2017

Richard Blumenthal

Senate Resolution 59, introduced in the United States Senate on February 10, 2017, would, if passed, express the Senate's support of designating February 12, 2017, as Darwin Day, and its recognition of "Charles Darwin as a worthy symbol on which to celebrate the achievements of reason, science, and the advancement of human knowledge."

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02.10.2017

"The House Education Committee voted Thursday [February 9, 2017] to remove references to climate change and human impact on the environment from a new set of science standards," according to Idaho Ed News (February 9, 2017).

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