Colorado

06.14.2018

The Colorado state board of education voted to adopt a new set of state science standards on June 13, 2018, despite opposition from members of the board who "disliked the way the standards treated climate change as a real phenomenon," according to Chalkbeat (June 14, 2018).

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07.28.2017

The Aurora Sentinel (July 27, 2017) reviewed the state of climate change education in Colorado, observing, "teachers, scientists[,] and government officials agree the controversial topic is handled disparately across the state," owing to state science standards that "seek to teach the accepted science of the issue, but also help students understand the controversy itself and come to their own conclusions."

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09.04.2013

Seventy percent of Coloradans accept that global warming is happening, according to a new report (PDF) from the Yale Project on Climate Communication. But less than half accept that human activity is responsible for global warming, and half think that there is no consensus among the scientific community whether global warming is happening.

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02.04.2013

House Bill 13-1089 (PDF), which would have encouraged teachers in Colorado to misrepresent the scientific status of evolution and climate change, was rejected by a 7-6 vote in the House Committee on Education on February 4, 2013.

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01.18.2013

House Bill 13-1089 (PDF), introduced in the Colorado House of Representatives on January 16, 2013, and assigned to the House Committees on Education and Appropriations, would create "Academic Freedom Acts" for both K-12 public schools and institutes of higher education in the state of Colorado.

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04.10.2002
On April 9, 2002 the Board of Education of the Liberty J-4 School District voted 5-0 against a proposal to include creationism in its science classes. Located in Joes, Colorado, about 150 miles east of Denver, the district serves just over 100 students.

On March 12 the board had voted unanimously to include creationism. Local residents contacted NCSE requesting information about “creation science” and the legal consequences of the board’s proposal.
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