The Clergy Climate Letter

06.11.2015

Over one hundred clergy — including leaders of Christian, Jewish, Unitarian, and Humanist groups — have endorsed a new Clergy Climate Letter. The letter, modeled roughly on the pro-evolution Clergy Letter Project (which boasts over 13,000 clergy), was vetted by leaders from many denominations. The initial signers come from twenty-six states and four countries. The letter reads:

We, the undersigned clergy and leaders from diverse denominations and philosophical traditions, believe that the scientific consensus about human-caused climate change demands response on the part of the communities we serve. Concern for our fellow humans and for the countless members of our global ecosystem — whether we call it "creation care," "stewardship," or by some other name — is common to all our traditions.

As leaders within our religious and ethical communities, we believe that the teachings and ideas that guide our actions comfortably coexist with the discoveries of modern science. Human-caused climate change is a scientific truth that has stood up to rigorous scrutiny. Our beliefs and traditions compel us to accept the scientific truth and resist efforts to obscure or deny it. Humanity is conducting an unprecedented and possibly irreversible experiment on our planet, and our descendants will be living with the consequences of this experiment for centuries to come. Scientific knowledge and our faiths and philosophies can work together to heal this world.

Ann Reid, NCSE's executive director, explained: "The National Center for Science Education has always worked across religious boundaries to build support for science and science education, and this project is no different. Climate change is a scientific matter, but clearly raises profound spiritual and moral questions. This letter's signers can be a vital resource for people trying to understand the implications of the science for their own lives." Clergy who support the letter are encouraged to register their endorsement at clergyclimate.org.

Update: You can see the full list of signers by religious tradition or geography at clergyclimate.org. The current count stands at: