News

01.07.2002

by Eugenie C. Scott

On January 7, 2002, the US Supreme Court denied the appeal of Minnesota teacher Rodney LeVake to have his case for teaching "evidence against evolution" heard at the highest level. Mr. LeVake has no further appeals.
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01.02.2002
Science Excellence for All Ohioans, listed on their web site as a project of the American Family Association of Ohio, has posted on its web site a list of changes it would like to see incorporated into the new Ohio Science Standards. The purpose of the changes is to bring intelligent design into the science curriculum as a “viable alternative explanation for both the origin and diversity of life”.
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12.28.2001
Creationists began attacking the PBS series Evolution even before it began to air. A steady stream of misinformation and bad science came from such organizations as Answers in Genesis, the Discovery Institute, and the Institute for Creation Research.

NCSE responded to many of the claims made by these groups, often consulting with leading scientists in various fields.

 

 

 

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12.21.2001
The Elementary and Secondary Education Authorization Act which is headed for the President's signature does not contain the antievolution "Santorum amendment", though there is brief mention of the topic of evolution in explanatory materials appended to the law. The good news for teachers is that they will not have to teach evolution any differently as a result of the new legislation.

Background

Since the summer of 2001, a joint Senate-House conference committee has attempted to resolve the House and Senate versions of the Elementary and
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12.21.2001
Science Excellence for All Ohioans (SEAO), a group described on their web site as a project of the American Family Association of Ohio, claims that the biggest problem in science education in Ohio is the "censoring" of "evidence for design." Their mission includes lobbying for changes in the newly introduced statewide science standards to include intelligent design (ID). Also posted on their web site is a bill, not yet introduced in the Ohio legislature, calling for "both
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12.05.2001
NCSE in cooperation with the University of California Museum of Paleontology has prepared a "Blueprint for an Evolution Education Workshop." This "how to" guide is a project arising from discussions held at the National Conference on the Teaching of Evolution, held in October, 2000 in Berkeley (http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/ncte/).
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11.16.2001
On November 15, 2001, the Pennsylvania Independent Regulatory Review Commission (IRRC) unanimously approved the latest version of the Science and Technology education standards proposed by the state’s Board of Education (BoE). This is the last step before adoption and implementation of the standards, which will be reviewed again in five years.
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11.12.2001
NOTE: Since this was posted on November 12, 2001, Answers in Genesis, responding to our citations of their errors, has rewritten the piece we were commenting upon. The quotes in our article were cut and pasted directly from the AiG site to ensure one hundred percent accuracy; they are exactly as they appeared in the original article.
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11.07.2001
by Eric Meikle

The Alabama State Board of Education voted on November 8, 2001 to require that a statement referring to evolution as controversial be inserted in science textbooks. Since 1995 an evolution disclaimer (see below) has been pasted in Alabama's state-approved texts. Early this year the Board of Education adopted a new K-12 science education framework, the Alabama Course of Study: Science (ACOSS). Some observers had thought that Board might simply drop the previous disclaimer, given changes in ACOSS since 1995.

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