News

05.03.2016
Rafters dwarfed by Vulcan's Anvil, a lump of cooled magma in the middle of the Colorado RiverNCSE rafters examining Vulcan's Anvil, one of Grand Canyon's geological wonders. Photo by Josh Rosenau, 2014.

NCSE is pleased to announce the winners of the second teacher scholarships on our annual Grand Canyon raft trip: Brandon Haught of University High School, Orange City, Florida, and Crystal Davis of Hawthorne Math and Science Academy, Hawthorne, California. They will receive an all-expenses-paid eight-day raft trip through the Grand Canyon, guided by two members of NCSE's staff and joining twenty other NCSE members and supporters who purchased seats on the trip. The scholarship funds were donated by the generosity of NCSE's members.

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12.29.2015

Two bills introduced in the Florida legislature — House Bill 899 and Senate Bill 1018 — are ostensibly aimed at empowering taxpayers to object to the use of specific instructional materials in the public schools, for example on the grounds that they fail to provide "a noninflammatory, objective, and balanced viewpoint on issues." There is reason to believe that evolution and climate change are among the targets.

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12.28.2015

Zack KopplinZack Kopplin

Writing in The Daily Beast (December 28, 2015), Zack Kopplin reviews the last decade of antievolution strategies — with the assistance of a former employee of the Discovery Institute, the de facto institutional home of "intelligent design" creationism.

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12.28.2015

Alfred G. Gilman, via University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterAlfred G. Gilman, via University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

The eminent pharmacologist and biochemist Alfred G. Gilman — a member of NCSE's Advisory Council — died on December 23, 2015, at the age of 74, according to The New York Times (December 24, 2015). Gilman and Martin Rodbell were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1994 for "their discovery of G-proteins and the role of these proteins in signal transduction in cells." The Times explains that their "research helped scientists understand how the body receives signals and transmits outside stimuli like light and odor, and from a variety of hormones in the body" and also increased understanding of certain types of cancer and hereditary glandular disorders.

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12.25.2015

The chorus of support for the teaching of evolution continues, with a statement from the Royal Astronomical Society, adopted in 2011.

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