NCSE

12.19.2002
Over seventy-five years after the Scopes trial, the controversy over the teaching of creationism in the public schools continues unabated. On the front lines of the controversy is the National Center for Science Education — NCSE — the only organization entirely devoted to defending the teaching of evolution in the public schools. Among the tools that NCSE provides for those wishing to defend the teaching of evolution is its publication Voices for Evolution, published first in 1989 and then in a revised edition in 1995.
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10.28.2002
Dr. Eugenie C. Scott, Executive Director of NCSE, was awarded the California Science Teachers Association Margaret Nicholson Distinguished Service Award at the CSTA's annual meeting in San Francisco on October 25, 2002.
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05.30.2002
Stephen Jay Gould, the sometimes controversial but always tireless advocate of quality science education, has died at the age of 60. In addition to his valuable scientific work, Gould was a fierce foe of creationism; he was a valued Supporter of NCSE.
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05.29.2002
The distinguished biologist John A. Moore, Professor Emeritus of Biology at the University of California, Riverside, member of the National Academy of Sciences, and Supporter of NCSE, died on May 26, 2002.
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05.09.2002
On May 9, Francisco J. Ayala, Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine, was named by President Bush to receive the National Medal for Science, the nation’s highest award for lifetime achievement in scientific research. Ayala will receive the medal at a ceremony at the White House on June 13. As the National Science Foundation’s citationist wrote, “Ayala has revolutionized evolution theory by pioneering molecular biology in the investigation of evolutionary processes.
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05.08.2002
At a black-tie dinner in Washington DC on May 7, 2002, Eugenie C. Scott, executive director of NCSE, was presented with the 2002 National Science Board Public Service Award. The National Science Board is the governing board of the National Science Foundation.
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04.25.2002
The web site of Actionbioscience.org, described as a “non-commercial, educational web site created and managed by BioScience Productions, Inc. to promote bioscience literacy,” features an excerpt from the April 2, 2002, issue of Natural History. (Updated October 13, 2004: Actionbioscience.org is now an education resource of the American Institute of Biological Sciences and no longer associated with BioScience Productions, Inc.)

The posting consists of brief position statements by three leading proponents of intelligent design (ID), and three accompanying rebuttals.
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04.08.2002

NCSE is pleased to see that the Center for Renewal of Science and Culture (CRSC) has begun taking steps to correct the error in the article posted on its web site concerning the March 11, 2002 Ohio Board of Education meeting.

Fred Hutchison claims that the papers in the CRSC bibliography delivered to the Ohio BOE were written by “intelligent design scientists.” This is incorrect.

The CRSC has posted an editor’s comment above the article highlighting the error, but did not correct the error in the text of the article itself.
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03.11.2002
Congratulations to NCSE member Adrian Melott, who has won the 2002 Joseph A. Burton Forum Award of the American Physical Society. This award is given annually by the leading professional physics society "(t)o recognize outstanding contributions to the public understanding or resolution of issues involving the interface of physics and society." Dr. Melott, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Kansas, was cited "(f)or his outstanding efforts in helping to restore evolution and cosmology to their proper place in the K-12 scientific curriculum.
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02.07.2002

by Alan Gishlick

In a Discovery Institute press release dated Feb. 6, Jonathan Wells accuses three developmental biologists of making "exaggerated claims" in a recent paper in Nature (advance online publication, Feb. 6, 2002). But it is Wells, in his zeal to criticize any research supporting evolution, whose claims are "exaggerated."
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