The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

12.28.2004

As predicted, the balance of power on the Kansas Board of Education [Link is broken] tilted in favor of anti-evolutionists after the November 2, 2004, election. When Kathy Martin replaces Bruce Wyatt on the District 6 seat on the board, the anti-evolution faction will have a 6-4 majority.

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12.22.2004

On December 6, 2004, the Grantsburg, Wisconsin, school board passed a third version of a resolution on its science curriculum by a vote of 6 to 1. Two previous versions of the policy were widely criticized as obvious attempts to require or allow the teaching of various forms of creationism, including "intelligent design," in the district's science classes. The policy states:

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12.20.2004

by Nick Matzke
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12.14.2004

by American Civil Liberties Union

Pennsylvania Parents File First-Ever Challenge to "Intelligent Design" Instruction in Public Schools

"Intelligent Design" is Religious Argument, not Science, Say Parents

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12.09.2004

The cover story of the December 2004 Phi Delta Kappan is Mark Terry's "One Nation, Under the Designer," which warns of "a sea change in the tactics of the anti-evolution forces, whose efforts have waxed and waned ever since the Scopes Trial." Terry writes:
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12.09.2004

No fewer than three recent articles in the national media discussed the continuing struggle over evolution education in the United States. Unsurprisingly, NCSE, as the only national organization wholly devoted to promoting and defending the teaching of evolution in the public schools, was prominently featured in all three.

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12.09.2004
On December 1, 2004, House Bill 35 was introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives. (Although the legislature is not in session until January 5, 2005, in Missouri it is possible to "prefile" bills and resolutions in order to expedite legislation.) HB 35 would require that:
All biology textbooks sold to the public schools of the state of Missouri shall have one or more chapters containing a critical analysis of origins.
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12.08.2004

by Nick Matzke

Several new developments have occurred surrounding the controversy in Dover, Pennsylvania over the "intelligent design" textbook Of Pandas and People and the passage of a policy requiring the teaching of intelligent design.
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12.06.2004

The op-ed page of The New York Times for December 5, 2004, features a chart of "The Descent of Dissent" by Swarthmore biology professor Colin B. Purrington and graphic designer Felix Sockwell. Based on Purrington's web page satirizing textbook evolution disclaimers of the sort used in Alabama and Cobb County, Georgia, the chart entertainingly plots the course of further possible disclaimers.

"The Descent of Dissent" in The New York Times

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12.03.2004

The controversy over the Dover (Pennsylvania) Area School Board's resolution reading "Students will be made aware of gaps/problems in Darwin's Theory and of other theories of evolution including, but not limited to, intelligent design" continues to reverberate. On November 30, 2004, the San Francisco Chronicle carried a lengthy front page story entitled "Anti-evolution teachings gain foothold in U.S. schools," focusing on the situation in Dover. NCSE's executive director Eugenie C.

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11.30.2004

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott appeared on the "Fair and Balanced" segment of Fox News on November 27, 2004, to discuss "intelligent design" opposite John West of the Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. The segment began with a reference to the decision of the Dover (Pennsylvania) school board to require the teaching of "intelligent design," a subject that West evidently preferred not to discuss.
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11.24.2004

Following on the heels of Gallup's latest poll, CBS News recently conducted a poll of public opinion about evolution, creationism, and science education.

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11.22.2004

The eminent Protestant theologian Langdon Gilkey died on November 19, 2004, at the age of 85, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Born in Chicago in 1919, where his father was a liberal Baptist minister, Gilkey studied at Harvard University before traveling to China to teach English. He was captured and interned by the Japanese until the end of World War II, which he described in his memoir Shantung Compound (1966). After his release, he moved to New York and studied theology with Reinhold Niebuhr, graduating with a doctorate in religion from Columbia University.
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11.19.2004

A recent article from the Gallup News Service reports on the pollster's latest results concerning public opinion on the evidence for evolution, creationism, and biblical literalism. Because Gallup's polls on public opinion on creationism extend back to 1982, its data are particularly useful. The results are overall consistent with previous polls conducted by Gallup.

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11.08.2004
Cobb County, Georgia, has been the site of controversy over creationism and evolution off and on for decades. On November 8, 2004, a lawsuit began in the most recent chapter of this district's dissatisfaction with the teaching of evolution.
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11.08.2004
A small Wisconsin town about sixty miles northeast of Minneapolis is the latest hot-spot in the evolution/creationism controversy. On June 28, 2004, the Grantsburg school board unanimously passed a motion "... to direct our science department to teach all theories of origins." Over the summer, local parents and concerned citizens raised questions about the meaning and purpose of the motion.
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10.26.2004
Interviewed by The New York Times, Roger Kennedy, a former director of the National Park Service, expressed concern about the presence of the young-earth creationist anthology Grand Canyon: A Different View in the NPS-supervised bookstores in Grand Canyon National Park. Referring to the fact that many visitors to the park will assume that any book sold in the bookstores are approved by the NPS, he remarked: "That's the problem ... and we need to pay attention to it."
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10.25.2004
The cover story in the November 2004 issue of National Geographic, by the acclaimed science writer David Quammen, is entitled "Was Darwin Wrong?" And, of course, the answer is no.
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10.24.2004
On Monday, Oct. 4, the governing council of the Biological Society of Washington issued a new statement regarding the publication of a paper by Intelligent Design advocate and Discovery Institute Center for Science and Culture director, Stephen C. Meyer, in the society's journal, Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington.
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10.21.2004
In a surprise move, a Pennsylvania school board recently voted to include "intelligent design" in the district's science curriculum. At its meeting on October 18, 2004, the Dover Area School Board revised the science curriculum to include the following:
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10.15.2004
The controversy over the sale of the creationist anthology Grand Canyon: A Different View in the bookstores in Grand Canyon National Park is back in the headlines.
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10.15.2004
Evolution is a problem for some of the members of the Charles County, Maryland, Board of Education, to judge from a recently released list of goals and suggestions compiled by its members. Among the entries were recommendations not to use 10th-grade biology textbooks "biased toward evolution" and to provide creationist books and videos to students.
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10.15.2004
Evolution is a problem for some of the members of the Charles County, Maryland, Board of Education, to judge from a recently released list of goals and suggestions compiled by its members. Among the entries were recommendations not to use 10th-grade biology textbooks "biased toward evolution" and to provide creationist books and videos to students.
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