The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

12.26.2017

Reports of the NCSE logo

NCSE is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Reports of the National Center for Science Education is now available on-line. The issue — volume 38, number 1 — is the ninth issue in the newsletter's new, streamlined, and full-color format.

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12.21.2017

Larry FlammerLarry Flammer, a master biology teacher, died on December 13, 2017, at the age of 83, according to e-mail from his family.

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12.13.2017

Report coverA new report from the Yale Program on Climate Communication offers new data on Americans' beliefs and attitudes about climate change, with a particular emphasis on the influence of political views.

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12.12.2017

HuffPost logoA new study suggests that textbooks that miseducate students about evolution and climate change may be in wide use in private schools that receive public funding through voucher or tax-credit schemes, according to Rebecca Klein in a lengthy article in the Huffington Post (December 7, 2017).

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12.01.2017

"A controversial new state law that makes it easier for Florida residents to challenge books used in public schools could get overhauled next year so those who dislike certain texts could also suggest replacements they find more appropriate," reports the Orlando Sentinel (December 1, 2017).

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12.01.2017

Colin Groves, via Wikimedia CommonsThe eminent biological anthropologist Colin Groves died on November 30, 2017, at the age of 75, according to a press release from the Australian National University.

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12.01.2017

Jerry Fodor, via Wikimedia CommonsThe distinguished philosopher of mind Jerry Fodor died on November 29, 2017, at the age of 82, according to The New York Times (November 30, 2017).

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11.29.2017

Florida's House Bill 825, prefiled on November 28, 2017, would, if enacted, require "[c]ontroversial theories and concepts ... [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner," while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives "equivalent to or more rigorous than" them.

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11.28.2017

The effects of Florida's new law making it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to harass their local school districts are already manifesting, according to a report from the Associated Press (November 18, 2017). 

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11.27.2017

Thanks in part to NCSE's efforts, it was a bad year for those who would make it easier to miseducate kids about science, with one major exception: Florida. Signed into law in June 2017, Florida's House Bill 989 allows any county resident—not just any parent with a child in the country's public schools—to file a complaint about textbooks and other instructional materials. Climate change and evolution were clearly among the targets of HB 989.

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11.27.2017

Scientific American coverNCSE's Glenn Branch and Ann Reid's "50 Years Ago: Repeal of Tennessee's 'Monkey Law'" was selected for inclusion in "The Science Behind the Debates," a special edition of Scientific American dated December 2017.

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11.22.2017

Alan WalkerThe distinguished paleoanthropologist Alan Walker died on November 20, 2017, at the age of 79, according to a November 21, 2017, Facebook post from his wife Pat Shipman.

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11.20.2017

Florida's Senate Bill 966, prefiled on November 17, 2017, would, if enacted, require "[c]ontroversial theories and concepts ... [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner," while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives "equivalent to or more rigorous than" them.

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11.20.2017

Kenneth R. Miller

Kenneth R. Miller, president of NCSE's board of directors and professor of biology at Brown University, features in a ten-minute documentary about current threats to evolution education, produced by Retro Report and hosted at The New York Times.

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11.17.2017

Darwin's BackyardNCSE is pleased to offer a free preview (PDF) of James T. Costa's Darwin's Backyard: How Small Experiments Led to a Big Theory (W. W. Norton, 2017). 

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11.15.2017

Bertha VazquezNCSE is pleased to congratulate Bertha Vazquez on receiving the Evolution Education Award for 2017 from the National Association of Biology Teachers.

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11.14.2017

New Mexico is now officially the nineteenth state to have adopted the Next Generation Science Standards. 

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11.08.2017

Paranoid Science coverNCSE is pleased to offer a free preview (PDF) of Antony Alumkal's Paranoid Science: The Christian Right's War on Reality (New York University Press, 2017).

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11.02.2017

On November 2, 2017, the Utah state board of education voted 10-4 to begin the process of revising the state science standards for elementary and high school — albeit "[o]ver objections that national science education standards push a political agenda on global warming and do not include instruction of intelligent design as a counterpoint to teaching evolution," according to the Deseret News (November 2, 2017).

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11.02.2017

NCSE's archives house a unique trove of material on the creationism/evolution controversy, and we regard it as part of our mission to preserve it for posterity — as well as for occasions such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, where NCSE's archives helped to establish the creationist antecedents of the "intelligent design" movement. And we are beginning to amass a similar trove of material on disputes over climate change education.

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10.26.2017

"After facing an onslaught of opposition, New Mexico's Public Education Department officials on Wednesday decided to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards 'in their entirety,'" the Albuquerque Journal (October 25, 2017), reports.

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10.19.2017

After a public hearing in Santa Fe in which the flawed science standards for New Mexico were consistently opposed, the Public Education Department is promising to restore part of the removed content on evolution, the age of the earth and climate change — but important concerns remain.

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10.18.2017

CSTA logoNCSE was selected by the California Science Teachers Association to receive its Distinguished Contributions Award for 2017.

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10.17.2017

Glenn Branch

NCSE's deputy director Glenn Branch contributed a column, entitled "Why the Scientific Consensus on Climate Change Matters for Science Education," to the October 2017 issue of The Science Teacher, a special issue devoted to climate change.

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10.12.2017

As the October 16, 2017, public hearing in Santa Fe on the new state science standards proposed for New Mexico approaches, there is no sign of the opposition to their omission of references to evolution, human responsibility for climate change, and the age of the earth abating.

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