The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us. Contact: Robert Luhn, Director of Communications at luhn@ncse.com

08.24.2015

We laughed, we cried, we felt a thousand emotions. And when the dust finally settled, we were left with the usual pile of dead anti-science copycat bills, often from the usual players. We're looking at you, Missouri and Oklahoma.

The tally was nearly identical to 2014's. Four bills targeted evolution, one climate science, two unspecified "scientific controversies," and one adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

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04.08.2015

Ask me how I'm warming the planet bumper sticker

From "Evolutionists do it with increasing complexity" to "Honk if you understand punctuated equilibria," NCSE has long been your go-to place for clever evolution bumper stickers. But now that NCSE is also defending the teaching of climate science, it's time to update the inventory — and it could be with your brilliant idea.

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03.23.2015

NCSE recognizes Neil Shubin, Naomi Oreskes, Ronald Numbers, Greg Craven, and the Alliance for Climate Education for their tireless work defending and promoting science education.

Not all stars obsess about mansions, manicures, or money. The celebrities recognized by NCSE's 2015 Friend of Darwin and Friend of the Planet awards confront science denial in every venue, from the silver screen to YouTube to high school auditoriums.

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