The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us. Contact: Robert Luhn, Director of Communications at luhn@ncse.com

12.17.2014

Texas State Board of Education must still vote on adopting the revised textbooks

CONTACTS:
Robert Luhn, NCSE, 510/601-7203
Dan Quinn, TFN, 512/322-0545
Lisa Hoyos, Climate Parents, 510/282-0440

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10.20.2014

Proposed social studies textbooks get climate change wrong, distort facts, deny science

CONTACTS:
Robert Luhn, NCSE, 510/601-7203
Dan Quinn, TFN, 512/322-0545
Lisa Hoyos, Climate Parents, 510/282-0440

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09.15.2014

Tell Textbook Publishers "Get the Science Right!" Keep climate change denial out of textbooks.The Texas state board of education will adopt new social studies textbooks in November, 2014. The decisions they make will affect Texas classrooms for years to come, and are likely to change how textbooks are written for use in other states as well.

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09.14.2014

One textbook absurdly portrays advocacy group as a science authority

An examination of how proposed social studies textbooks for Texas public schools address climate change reveals distortions and bias that misrepresent the broad scientific consensus on the phenomenon.

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06.28.2014

The Friend of Darwin Award recognizes the Kitzmiller v. Dover legal team and a stalwart evolution writer. The new Friend of the Planet award recognizes an outspoken climate scientist and a revered writer

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06.03.2014

Like the swallows returning to Capistrano, science deniers flocked to familiar ground in 2014. Three bills attacking evolution and three bills hammering on "scientific controversies" were trotted out in Missouri, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Virginia. All went down to defeat. Bills targeting climate change specifically were nowhere to be found. (More on that below.) But the trend is clear—expect future anti-science bills to be vague, focusing on "scientific controversies" instead of specific domains.

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