The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

12.28.2009

As 2009 and its celebrations of the bicentennial of Darwin's birth and the sesquicentennial of the publication of the Origin near their end, NCSE is pleased to bid them farewell by offering a peek at two reviews forthcoming in 2010 in Reports of the NCSE.

+ read
12.24.2009

NCSE's Steven Newton's op-ed "Science denial is on the rise" appeared in the December 24, 2009, issue of the Philadelphia Inquirer.

+ read
12.18.2009

There's still time to vote for NCSE, if you're a Working Assets/Credo Mobile customer.

+ read
12.16.2009

Selected content from volume 29, number 4, of Reports of the National Center for Science Education is now available on NCSE's website.

+ read
12.14.2009

NCSE is seeking volunteers to assist in translating selected resources from its website into Spanish. If you read and write both languages fluently, are interested in helping NCSE's outreach to the Spanish-speaking community, and are able to make a serious commitment to the project, you are cordially invited to get in touch with NCSE's Peter M. J. Hess at espanol@ncse.com.

+ read
12.09.2009
Eugenie C. ScottEugenie C. Scott

Now available on NCSE's YouTube channel: Eugenie C. Scott's "Creationism: Still crazy after all these years," a presentation at the 2009 Atheist Alliance International conference in Burbank, California. Scott describes the evolving history of the antievolution movement in the United States, from attempts to balance the teaching of evolution with "creation science" or "intelligent design" to the present spate of stealth creationist tactics such as "academic freedom" and (in Texas) "all sides of scientific evidence."

+ read
12.08.2009

NCSE shifts from .org to .com domain

NCSE is now using ncse.com—shorter and easier to remember than ncseweb.org—as its primary domain name. The change is already in effect on NCSE's web site and e-mail. But never fear: links and e-mail to ncseweb.org will be automatically forwarded to ncse.com.

+ read
12.07.2009

NCSE is now using ncse.com — shorter and easier to remember than ncseweb.org — as its primary domain name. The change is already in effect on NCSE's website and e-mail. But never fear: links and e-mail to ncseweb.org will be automatically forwarded to ncse.com.

NCSE is grateful to Jeff Bennett, president and chief operating officer of NameMedia, Inc., for extending a substantial discount on the ncse.com domain. Said Bennett, "We understand that you are a non-profit organization with a big mission." It's a mission that you can support by joining or renewing today — at ncse.com.

+ read
12.02.2009

Adding to the recent celebrations of the sesquicentennial anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species on November 24, 1859, were three members of NCSE, writing for their local newspapers.

+ read
11.13.2009
Eugenie C. ScottEugenie C. Scott

Videos of two recent events featuring NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott are now available on-line. First, from WOSU Public Media in Columbus, Ohio, there's "In the Beginning — Explanations from Science and Religion," a panel discussion featuring Scott, Francisco Ayala, and Denis O. Lamoureux, hosted by National Public Radio's Neal Conan. Second, from the American Humanist Association in Washington DC, there's "Evolution v. Creationism: The Politics, the Science, the Debate," a panel discussion featuring Scott, Barbara Forrest, and Kenneth R. Miller. Tune in and enjoy!

+ read
11.04.2009

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott was invited to debate Ray Comfort, a creationist in the news recently for his plans to distribute copies of the Origin of Species with his own introduction, on the God & Country blog of U.S. News & World Report.

+ read
10.30.2009
US News and World Report logo

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott takes aim at creationist Ray Comfort's distorted views on evolution in a special debate taking place on the U.S. News & World Report site. The debate centers on Comfort's 54-page introduction to a "special" edition of Darwin's On the Origin of Species that will be given away on college campuses across America, starting November 19.

+ read
10.27.2009
Norman LevittNorman Levitt

Norman Levitt, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University and a fierce critic of pseudoscience, died on October 23, 2009, in New York City, according to the obituary in eSkeptic (October 26, 2009).

+ read
10.23.2009

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott is on the revamped and expanded Board of Advisers of Scientific American, announced in the magazine's November 2009 issue.

+ read
10.21.2009
Kevin PadianKevin Padian

Kevin Padian discusses — and debunks — "Ten Myths about Charles Darwin" in the October 2009 issue of BioScience. "Charles Darwin is one of the most revered (and at times reviled) figures in Western history. A great many 'facts' about him and his ideas are the stuff of textbook myths, others are inaccuracies spread by antievolutionists, and still others are conventional historical mistakes long corrected but still repeated," he writes.

+ read
10.19.2009

NCSE's Scott joins Scientific American's revamped Board of Advisers

Dr. Eugenie C. Scott has joined Scientific American's revamped and expanded Board of Advisers. In her new role, Dr. Scott will have a hand in shaping the course of the magazine, offering advice and feedback on upcoming editorial plans, manuscripts, article proposals, and more.

+ read
10.15.2009

At last, the latest iteration of NCSE's pioneering experimental steveometry apparatus — the Project Steve t-shirt — is available for order! The names of the first 1099 signatories to Project Steve are printed in white on a quality cotton/poly black t-shirt, along with the slogan, "Over 1000 scientists named Steve agree.

+ read
10.12.2009

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott will receive the Fellows' Medal, the highest honor of the California Academy of Sciences, in a ceremony in San Francisco on October 13, 2009.

+ read
10.11.2009
Brian AltersBrian Alters

NCSE is delighted to congratulate Brian Alters, a member of NCSE's board of directors, on receiving the prestigious McNeil Medal for the Public Awareness of Science from the Royal Society of Canada, in recognition of "his world-famous work on the promotion of education about evolution."

+ read
09.20.2009

Selected content from volume 29, number 3, of Reports of the National Center for Science Education is now available on NCSE's website.

+ read
09.11.2009

In a guest post at The Panda's Thumb blog, NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott reviewed the new film about Darwin, Creation, describing it as "a thoughtful, well-made film that will change many views of Darwin held by the public — for the good."

+ read
09.09.2009

Richard Dawkins's new book The Greatest Show on Earth (Free Press, 2009) "is a positive commemoration of the triumph of a grand arching theory that has withstood the continuous onslaught of 150 years of new data, including the tsunami of molecular, genetic, and sequence data from the past fifteen years," according to Douglas Theobald, whose review now appears in the advance on-line section of NCSE's website.

+ read
09.08.2009

NCSE is twittering! The latest in the creationism/evolution controversy, in 140-character bursts! Join now to start receiving NCSE's tweets.

+ read
08.29.2009
HMS BeagleHMS Beagle

On August 29, 1831, Darwin received a letter broaching the idea of his sailing on the Beagle. After his father reluctantly decided to allow him to go and after Captain FitzRoy overcame his qualms about the troubling shape of the young naturalist's nose, Darwin embarked on a voyage around the world — and the rest is history. To celebrate the anniversary, NCSE is offering advance on-line publication of a handful of reviews on recent books about Darwin.

+ read
08.26.2009

With the addition of Stephen D. Kinrade on August 25, 2009, NCSE's Project Steve attained its 1100th signatory.

+ read