The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

12.27.2005

Barbara Forrest appeared on Talk of the Nation's Science Friday on December 23, 2005, to discuss the decision in Kitzmiller v. Dover. Forrest, who testified on the history of the "intelligent design" movement on behalf of the plaintiffs, told the show's host Ira Flatow, "I'm very happy about the judge's ruling.

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12.06.2005

The trial in Kitzmiller v. Dover -- the first legal challenge to the constitutionality of teaching "intelligent design" in the public schools -- was one of the five biggest stories in Bioscience for 2005, in the view of The Scientist (December 5, 2005). NCSE's Eugenie C.

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10.20.2005

Just as the first challenge to the constitutionality of teaching "intelligent design" in the public school science classroom is underway in the trial of Kitzmiller v. Dover, Matthew J. Brauer, Barbara Forrest, and Steven G. Gey offer a definitive assessment of the legal issues involved in their new law review article "Is it science yet? Intelligent design creationism and the Constitution," published in Washington University Law Quarterly (2005; vol. 83, no. 1).

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10.06.2005

 

"Two groups examining the same evidence. Traveling nearly identical itineraries, snoozing under the same stars and bathing in the same chocolate-colored river. Yet, standing at opposite ends of the growing creation-evolution debate, they seemed to speak in different tongues." Thus Jodi Wilgoren's story "Seeing creation and evolution in Grand Canyon," published above the fold on the front page of the October 6, 2005, issue of The New York Times.

 

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10.05.2005

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott is to be presented with NABT's Honorary Member Award, given to those who have attained "distinction in teaching, research, or service in the biological sciences," at the National Association of Biology Teachers convention held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from October 5 to October 8, 2005. Also receiving the award will be NCSE member Randy Moore, a professor of biology at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and until recently the editor of The American Biology Teacher.

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09.20.2005

On September 15, 2005, the University of California Museum of Paleontology and NCSE launched a major expansion to the Understanding Evolution website. The initial Understanding Evolution site was intended for teachers, but with this update, the target audience is now everyone interested in learning about evolution. The site has numerous new feature articles, highlighting many aspects of evolution science, presented as interactive investigations, research profiles, evolution news (updated monthly), and even a comic strip.

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09.16.2005

With the addition of Steve Trigwell on September 12, 2005, NCSE's Project Steve attained its 600th signatory. A tongue-in-cheek parody of a long-standing creationist tradition of amassing lists of "scientists who doubt evolution" or "scientists who dissent from Darwinism," Project Steve mocks such lists by restricting its signatories to scientists whose first name is Steve (or a cognate, such as Stephanie, Esteban, or Stefano). About 1% of the United States population possesses such a first name, so each signatory represents about 100 potential signatories.

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09.08.2005

NCSE deputy director Glenn Branch contributed "The battle over evolution: How geoscientists can help" to the September 2005 issue (2.5M PDF) of The Sedimentary Record, published quarterly by the Society for Sedimentary Geology. "Eighty years after the Scopes trial," Branch writes in his abstract, "evolution is still under attack in the public school science classroom.

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07.05.2005

In her essay "How Quantum Physics Can Teach Biologists About Evolution," published in the July 5, 2005, issue of The New York Times, Cornelia Dean suggests that biologists would do better to defend evolution not by insisting on its truth per se but by explaining the scientific methodology on which it is based.

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06.10.2005

KEEP EVOLUTION WARNING LABELS OUT OF TEXTBOOKS, NCSE TELLS COURT


NATIONAL CENTER FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION
SUBMITS AMICUS BRIEF IN FEDERAL COURT
OPPOSING EVOLUTION DISCLAIMERS IN COBB COUNTY, GEORGIA, TEXTBOOKS
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05.06.2005

NCSE was featured prominently in Peter Slevin's article "Teachers, Scientists Vow to Fight Challenge to Evolution," published in the May 5, 2005, issue of the Washington Post. The article begins with a review of the situation in Kansas, where the state board of education is conducting a contentious series of hearings on the place of evolution in the state science standards.

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04.27.2005

Larry Caldwell, a parent in Roseville, California, has filed suit against Dr. Eugenie Scott, Executive Director of the National Center for Science Education, and the National Center for Science Education, Inc., alleging he was libeled by a recent article authored by Dr. Scott in California Wild magazine.
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04.20.2005

On April 21, 2005, NCSE executive director Eugenie C. Scott is scheduled to appear on MSNBC's Hardball show, hosted by Chris Matthews, to discuss the debate over evolution education, especially in Kansas. Also scheduled to appear is the Reverend Terry Fox, a Southern Baptist minister in Wichita, Kansas.
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03.04.2005

On March 2, 2005, The Ohio State University announced that NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the university's winter quarter commencement on March 20, where she will also deliver the commencement address. OSU's press release describes Scott as "considered one of the most active and articulate proponents for scientific literacy in the country ... nationally recognized as a proponent of the separation of church and state ...

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02.24.2005

Shortly after its second anniversary, Project Steve -- NCSE's exercise in poking fun at the lists of "scientists who doubt evolution" promulgated by antievolutionist groups -- was featured on the first page of the Sunday edition of one of Canada's leading newspapers.

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02.16.2005

Noted geologist and NCSE Supporter G. Brent Dalrymple was named a 2005 National Medal of Science Laureate, in an announcement made on February 14, 2005, by President Bush. The medals will be awarded at a White House ceremony on March 14, 2005.

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02.02.2005

Barbara Forrest was interviewed by Americans United for Separation of Church and State about her book (coauthored with Paul R. Gross) Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design (Oxford University Press, 2004). An excerpt from the interview will appear in the February 2005 issue of Church and State, the monthly journal of Americans United, and the complete text appears on the Americans United web site.
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02.01.2005

The February 7, 2005, issue of Newsweek contains a feature story about recent attempts across the country to insert "intelligent design" into public school science classrooms.

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01.21.2005

The eminent scholar Roland Mushat Frye died on January 20, 2005, at the age of 83, in Gladwyne, Pennsylvania. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1922, Frye earned three degrees, including his Ph.D., from Princeton University. He served in the United States Army during World War II and was awarded the Bronze Star. After the war, he taught at Emory University and was a research professor in residence at the Folger Shakespeare Library before settling at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was the Felix E. Schelling Professor of English Literature until retiring in 1983.

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01.19.2005

"Wedging creationism into the academy," by Barbara Forrest and Glenn Branch, appears in the January-February 2005 issue of Academe, the bimonthly magazine of the American Association of University Professors. In their article, Forrest and Branch discuss the attempts of the "intelligent design" movement to use academia as a base.

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