The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

05.14.2018

Connecticut's Senate Bill 345, addressing climate change education in the state's public schools, died when the Connecticut General Assembly adjourned sine die on May 10, 2018, as NCSE previously reported. But it turns out that its provisions were previously included in a different environment-related bill, House Bill 5360.

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05.11.2018

When the Connecticut General Assembly adjourned sine die on May 10, 2018, Senate Bill 345, addressing climate change education in the state's public schools, died on the House of Representatives calendar. 

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05.01.2018

Photograph: Architect of the Capitol, via Wikimedia Commons.A pair of bills introduced in Congress in April 2018 — S. 2740 in the Senate; H.R. 5606 in the House of Representatives — would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to institute a competitive grant program aimed in part at developing and improving educational material and teacher training on the topic of climate change.

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03.29.2018

When the Idaho legislature adjourned sine die on March 28, 2018, a three-year-long struggle over new state science standards ended, with a generally positive outcome.

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03.29.2018

A pair of "Campus Free Speech Acts," Assembly Bill 299 and Senate Bill 250, died in the Wisconsin legislature on March 28, 2018, when they failed to meet a deadline.

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03.14.2018

Idaho's House Concurrent Resolution 60 (PDF), introduced by the House Education Committee on March 12, 2018, would, if enacted, delete a single standard — ESS 3-4-1 — from the proposed science standards currently under legislative review.

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03.12.2018

When the Florida legislature adjourned sine die on March 11, 2018, two pairs of bills that would, in their different ways, have undermined the integrity of science education in the Sunshine State died.

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03.09.2018

 

Iowa's House File 2317, which if enacted would have reversed the state's adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards in 2005, died on February 16, 2018, when a deadline for bills to pass committee in their house of origin passed.

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03.02.2018

Connecticut's Senate Bill 345 would, if enacted, require the teaching of climate change "consistent with the Next Generation Science Standards" in the state's public schools, and would also task the state department of energy and environmental protection with helping local and regional school districts develop appropriate curricula to do so.

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02.26.2018

Florida's House Bill 827 and Senate Bill 1644 — similar bills that would make it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to smuggle instructional materials they favor into public school classrooms — were front and center in a recent report (February 23, 2018) in the journal Nature on legislation targeting the integrity of science education.

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02.26.2018

"After three years of resistance at the GOP-dominated Idaho Statehouse, including more pushback from House Republicans this session, the Senate Education Committee voted 6-3 on Thursday to approve revised school science standards as-is — with no parts relating to climate change deleted," reports the Idaho Statesman (February 22, 2018).

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02.16.2018

Florida's House Bill 827 — which would make it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to smuggle instructional materials they favor into public school classrooms — was approved, with slight modifications, by the House Education Committee on a 19-0 vote on February 15, 2018.

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02.14.2018

At its February 14, 2018, meeting, Idaho's Senate Education Committee heard testimony on the proposed state science standards. According to the Spokane Spokesman-Review (February 14, 2018), "fourteen people testified, all strongly in favor of adopting the revised standards as presented by the state Board of Education, rather than deleting parts."

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02.13.2018

House File 2317, introduced in the Iowa House of Representatives on February 12, 2018, and referred to the House Education Committee, would, if enacted, revert the state's science standards to "the science standards utilized by school districts in this state during the 2014-2015 school year" — just before the state adopted the Next Generation Science Standards.

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02.13.2018

Florida's Senate Bill 1644 — which would make it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to smuggle instructional materials they favor into public school classrooms — was approved by the Senate Education Committee on a 7-3 vote on February 12, 2018. 

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02.07.2018

"After hearing testimony from dozens of students, teachers and parents, all in favor of newly revised science standards for Idaho K-12 schools, the House Education Committee voted Feb. 7 to strip out sections from the standards that referred to the impact of fossil fuels on the environment — climate change," reports Boise Weekly (February 7, 2018).

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02.05.2018

When Idaho's House Education Committee held hearings on a new set of proposed science standards on February 1 and 2, 2018, it was expected to make a recommendation. But despite hearing from twenty-eight testifiers, all in favor of adoption, the committee failed to recommend approval of the standards. And several members of the committee objected to passages involving climate change and evolution.

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01.22.2018

Writing in the Orlando Sentinel (January 19, 2018), Brandon Haught was blunt: "Science education in Florida's public schools is facing an unprecedented assault that started last year and has the high potential to escalate this year. Evolution and climate change are the targets of a coordinated attack as detractors of these concepts seek to balance lessons with some forms of creationism or denial of human-caused climate change."
 

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01.08.2018

Senate Bill 1644, introduced by Tom Lee (R-District 20) on January 5, 2018, would, if enacted, revise the procedures for adopting instructional materials to permit members of the public to recommend instructional materials for consideration by the state or their district school board, which would then be required to get in touch with the publisher of those materials and allow it to submit a bid for evaluation.

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12.01.2017

"A controversial new state law that makes it easier for Florida residents to challenge books used in public schools could get overhauled next year so those who dislike certain texts could also suggest replacements they find more appropriate," reports the Orlando Sentinel (December 1, 2017).

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11.29.2017

Florida's House Bill 825, prefiled on November 28, 2017, would, if enacted, require "[c]ontroversial theories and concepts ... [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner," while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives "equivalent to or more rigorous than" them.

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11.27.2017

Thanks in part to NCSE's efforts, it was a bad year for those who would make it easier to miseducate kids about science, with one major exception: Florida. Signed into law in June 2017, Florida's House Bill 989 allows any county resident—not just any parent with a child in the country's public schools—to file a complaint about textbooks and other instructional materials. Climate change and evolution were clearly among the targets of HB 989.

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11.20.2017

Florida's Senate Bill 966, prefiled on November 17, 2017, would, if enacted, require "[c]ontroversial theories and concepts ... [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner," while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives "equivalent to or more rigorous than" them.

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07.24.2017

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"In statehouses around the country, the 2017 legislative session saw a flurry of attacks on science education," according to a story in the August 2017 issue of BioScience, published by the American Institute of Biological Sciences. 

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07.03.2017

Florida's new law making it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to harass their local school districts continues to be in the news. 

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