The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

06.20.2018

"The Collier County School Board voted 3-2 on Monday [June 18, 2018] to adopt a new batch of science textbooks after residents filed objections to more than a dozen of them," according to the Naples Daily News (June 19, 2018).

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06.18.2018

Half of the members of Michigan's state board of education would oppose the new proposed state social studies standards, which were revised to downplay climate change among other topics, according to a report from Bridge magazine (June 14, 2018). 

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06.14.2018

The Colorado state board of education voted to adopt a new set of state science standards on June 13, 2018, despite opposition from members of the board who "disliked the way the standards treated climate change as a real phenomenon," according to Chalkbeat (June 14, 2018).

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06.13.2018

References to climate change, among other topics, have been removed from a draft of Michigan's new proposed social studies standards by "a cadre of conservatives," according to a report from Bridge magazine (June 12, 2018). 

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05.16.2018

Figure from the Pew Research Center report"About half of Americans say the Earth is warming mosly due to human activity," according (PDF) to a new report from the Pew Research Center.

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05.14.2018

Connecticut's Senate Bill 345, addressing climate change education in the state's public schools, died when the Connecticut General Assembly adjourned sine die on May 10, 2018, as NCSE previously reported. But it turns out that its provisions were previously included in a different environment-related bill, House Bill 5360.

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05.11.2018

When the Connecticut General Assembly adjourned sine die on May 10, 2018, Senate Bill 345, addressing climate change education in the state's public schools, died on the House of Representatives calendar. 

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05.01.2018

Photograph: Architect of the Capitol, via Wikimedia Commons.A pair of bills introduced in Congress in April 2018 — S. 2740 in the Senate; H.R. 5606 in the House of Representatives — would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to institute a competitive grant program aimed in part at developing and improving educational material and teacher training on the topic of climate change.

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04.20.2018

Climate Change in the American Mind: March 2018 cover

Seven in ten Americans think that global warming is happening, and almost three in five think that, if it is happening, it is mostly owing to human activity, but only about one in seven know that nearly all climate scientists agree that global warming is happening as a result of human activity. Those were among the key findings of Climate Change in the American Mind: March 2018 (PDF).

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04.13.2018

"The Utah State Board of Education greenlit plans Thursday [April 12, 2018] to begin drafting new school science standards, a process likely to touch on divisive issues like climate change and evolution," according to the Salt Lake Tribune (April 13, 2018).

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04.12.2018

Map showing degree of support for climate change educationEven despite public controversies over the inclusion of climate change in state science standards, "Americans overwhelmingly support teaching our children about the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to global warming — in all 50 states and 3,000+ counties across the nation, including Republican and Democratic strongholds," according to the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (April 11, 2018).

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03.29.2018

When Governor Jay Inslee signed Senate Bill 6032 (PDF) into law on March 27, 2018, the state of Washington committed to provide $4 million "to provide grants ... for science teacher training in the [N]ext [G]eneration [S]cience [S]tandards" — adopted in 2013 — "including training in the climate science standards."

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03.29.2018

When the Idaho legislature adjourned sine die on March 28, 2018, a three-year-long struggle over new state science standards ended, with a generally positive outcome.

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03.29.2018

A pair of "Campus Free Speech Acts," Assembly Bill 299 and Senate Bill 250, died in the Wisconsin legislature on March 28, 2018, when they failed to meet a deadline.

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03.14.2018

Idaho's House Concurrent Resolution 60 (PDF), introduced by the House Education Committee on March 12, 2018, would, if enacted, delete a single standard — ESS 3-4-1 — from the proposed science standards currently under legislative review.

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03.12.2018

When the Florida legislature adjourned sine die on March 11, 2018, two pairs of bills that would, in their different ways, have undermined the integrity of science education in the Sunshine State died.

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03.09.2018

 

Iowa's House File 2317, which if enacted would have reversed the state's adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards in 2005, died on February 16, 2018, when a deadline for bills to pass committee in their house of origin passed.

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03.02.2018

Connecticut's Senate Bill 345 would, if enacted, require the teaching of climate change "consistent with the Next Generation Science Standards" in the state's public schools, and would also task the state department of energy and environmental protection with helping local and regional school districts develop appropriate curricula to do so.

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02.27.2018

Climate Fwd: logoNCSE was featured in Climate Fwd:The New York Times's e-newsletter "with stories and insights about climate change" — for February 21, 2018: "climate change is presented as a controversial subject in a significant number of American classrooms, according to research from the National Center for Science Education."

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02.26.2018

Florida's House Bill 827 and Senate Bill 1644 — similar bills that would make it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to smuggle instructional materials they favor into public school classrooms — were front and center in a recent report (February 23, 2018) in the journal Nature on legislation targeting the integrity of science education.

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02.26.2018

"After three years of resistance at the GOP-dominated Idaho Statehouse, including more pushback from House Republicans this session, the Senate Education Committee voted 6-3 on Thursday to approve revised school science standards as-is — with no parts relating to climate change deleted," reports the Idaho Statesman (February 22, 2018).

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02.16.2018

Florida's House Bill 827 — which would make it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to smuggle instructional materials they favor into public school classrooms — was approved, with slight modifications, by the House Education Committee on a 19-0 vote on February 15, 2018.

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02.14.2018

At its February 14, 2018, meeting, Idaho's Senate Education Committee heard testimony on the proposed state science standards. According to the Spokane Spokesman-Review (February 14, 2018), "fourteen people testified, all strongly in favor of adopting the revised standards as presented by the state Board of Education, rather than deleting parts."

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02.13.2018

House File 2317, introduced in the Iowa House of Representatives on February 12, 2018, and referred to the House Education Committee, would, if enacted, revert the state's science standards to "the science standards utilized by school districts in this state during the 2014-2015 school year" — just before the state adopted the Next Generation Science Standards.

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02.13.2018

Florida's Senate Bill 1644 — which would make it easier for creationists and climate change deniers to smuggle instructional materials they favor into public school classrooms — was approved by the Senate Education Committee on a 7-3 vote on February 12, 2018. 

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