The National Center for Science Education is the only national organization that specializes in defending the teaching of controversial issues (such as evolution and climate change) in public schools.

Because of our special expertise and experience, NCSE is often contacted by members of the press who are writing about the evolution/creationism controversy or about the teaching of global warming and other climate science issues that have come under political attack. Our staff can provide reliable information about creationism, evolution, climate change, and the state of science education in the United States.

If you need information, background, comments, or referrals to other sources, don't hesitate to contact us at media@ncse.com.

12.10.2018

"Newly elected Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has appointed the members of his transition team for education — and on it are two people linked to efforts to weaken the teaching of evolution and climate change, among other topics," reports Education Week (December 7, 2018).

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12.03.2018

Oklahoma's Senate Bill 14 (PDF), which would empower science denial in the classroom, was prefiled in the Oklahoma legislature.

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11.30.2018

Monmouth University logo

"An increasing number of Americans believe climate change is occurring, including a majority who now see this issue as a very serious problem," according to the latest Monmouth University Poll. "Scientists have long agreed that climate change is a very serious problem, and it is past time to take action. Now it is clear that a majority of Americans regardless of political party agree," commented Tony MacDonald, the director of the Urban Coast Institute at Monmouth University.

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11.02.2018

Frontline logo

A spate of scientifically accurate and pedagogically appropriate teaching materials about climate change is arriving, according to Frontline (November 2, 2018) — hopefully in time to stymie a new propaganda campaign rumored to be under way.

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11.02.2018

Undark logo

Sean Patrick Cooper, writing in Undark (November 2, 2018), reports, "Conservative groups are working hard to challenge the teaching of mainstream climate science in schools" — and cites NCSE as helping to prepare science teachers to resist the challenge.

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10.22.2018

The Arizona state board of education voted 6-4 to adopt a new set of state science standards at its October 22nd, 2018, meeting.

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10.01.2018

Earth magazine coverNCSE's deputy director Glenn Branch contributed "Why Is It So Hard to Teach Climate Change?" to the October 2018 issue of Earth magazine, published by the American Geosciences Institute.

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09.24.2018

"Parents and teachers on Monday [September 24, 2018] rallied outside an Arizona Board of Education meeting, and then took turns during the meeting blasting a proposal to remove references to evolution and climate change from state science standards," reported the Arizona Republic (September 24, 2018).

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09.20.2018

In a September 20, 2018, letter (PDF), the American Institute of Biological Sciences called on the Arizona state board of education to reject draft science standards that are to be presented to the board at its September 24, 2018, meeting.

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09.13.2018

As the latest draft (PDF) of a new set of state science standards for Arizona is apparently on its way to the state board of education for its approval, concerns about the compromised treatment of evolution remain — and have been now joined by concerns about the deletion of material about climate change.

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09.13.2018

NSTA logoThe National Science Teachers Association issued a position statement on the teaching of climate science on September 13, 2018.

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09.12.2018

Ann ReidIn a column (September 11, 2018) for Education Week, NCSE's executive director Ann Reid warned of the obstacles to effective climate change education — campaigns to promote doubt and denial, inadequate preparation provided for teachers, and the ideological polarization o

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08.15.2018

Graph from NSEE report

"A record 60% of Americans now think that global warming is happening and that humans are at least partially responsible for the rising temperature," according (PDF) to the latest survey from the National Studies on Energy and the Environment conducted by the University of Michigan and Muhlenberg College.

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07.10.2018

"Concerned that environmental groups were winning the hearts and minds of Texas schoolchildren — filling their heads with statements of the ills of fossil fuels — a politically connected Texas natural gas industry advocacy group devised a plan to fight back," reported the Austin American-Statesman (July 6, 2018).

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06.20.2018

"The Collier County School Board voted 3-2 on Monday [June 18, 2018] to adopt a new batch of science textbooks after residents filed objections to more than a dozen of them," according to the Naples Daily News (June 19, 2018).

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06.18.2018

Half of the members of Michigan's state board of education would oppose the new proposed state social studies standards, which were revised to downplay climate change among other topics, according to a report from Bridge magazine (June 14, 2018). 

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06.14.2018

The Colorado state board of education voted to adopt a new set of state science standards on June 13, 2018, despite opposition from members of the board who "disliked the way the standards treated climate change as a real phenomenon," according to Chalkbeat (June 14, 2018).

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06.13.2018

References to climate change, among other topics, have been removed from a draft of Michigan's new proposed social studies standards by "a cadre of conservatives," according to a report from Bridge magazine (June 12, 2018). 

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05.16.2018

Figure from the Pew Research Center report"About half of Americans say the Earth is warming mosly due to human activity," according (PDF) to a new report from the Pew Research Center.

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05.14.2018

Connecticut's Senate Bill 345, addressing climate change education in the state's public schools, died when the Connecticut General Assembly adjourned sine die on May 10, 2018, as NCSE previously reported. But it turns out that its provisions were previously included in a different environment-related bill, House Bill 5360.

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05.11.2018

When the Connecticut General Assembly adjourned sine die on May 10, 2018, Senate Bill 345, addressing climate change education in the state's public schools, died on the House of Representatives calendar. 

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05.01.2018

Photograph: Architect of the Capitol, via Wikimedia Commons.A pair of bills introduced in Congress in April 2018 — S. 2740 in the Senate; H.R. 5606 in the House of Representatives — would authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to institute a competitive grant program aimed in part at developing and improving educational material and teacher training on the topic of climate change.

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04.20.2018

Climate Change in the American Mind: March 2018 cover

Seven in ten Americans think that global warming is happening, and almost three in five think that, if it is happening, it is mostly owing to human activity, but only about one in seven know that nearly all climate scientists agree that global warming is happening as a result of human activity. Those were among the key findings of Climate Change in the American Mind: March 2018 (PDF).

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04.13.2018

"The Utah State Board of Education greenlit plans Thursday [April 12, 2018] to begin drafting new school science standards, a process likely to touch on divisive issues like climate change and evolution," according to the Salt Lake Tribune (April 13, 2018).

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04.12.2018

Map showing degree of support for climate change educationEven despite public controversies over the inclusion of climate change in state science standards, "Americans overwhelmingly support teaching our children about the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to global warming — in all 50 states and 3,000+ counties across the nation, including Republican and Democratic strongholds," according to the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (April 11, 2018).

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