Posted on August 17, 2018 * Comments

When I was asked to review The Tantrum that Saved the World, by Michael E. Mann and Megan Herbert [link to interview], I readily accepted. As a teacher and a parent, I know there are few children’s books available that address the most important global issue of our time—climate change. 

It’s an adult-sized issue, for sure, but sometimes it takes young voices that haven’t been muzzled by politics and special interests just to remind us to do what’s right. And besides, I could get help from twenty-one experts on children’s books—the fifth-graders in my classroom. 

Claire Adrian-Tucci's picture
Posted on July 26, 2018 * Comments

A Maryland high school environmental club uses a grant from NCSE's Science Booster Club to transform an overgrown garden into an oasis of native plants and beauty, drawing in the surrounding community to help along the way.

Brad Hoge's picture
Posted on June 25, 2018 * Comments

We welcomed our first eight NCSEteach Teacher Ambassadors in February through the Turning Misinformation into Educational Opportunities (TMEO) Workshop at George Mason University. This group of teachers developed a unit of 5 hands-on lessons on climate change and field tested them throughout this past semester.

Brad Hoge's picture
Posted on June 25, 2018 * Comments

We've chosen 10 amazing teachers to participate in the NCSEteach Teacher Ambassador Program Workshop for Evolution at Georgia Southern University in July. This is the second workshop conducted through our Teacher Ambassador Program (TAP), and the first focused exclusively on evolution.

Stephanie Keep's picture
Posted on June 12, 2018 * Comments

One of the hardest lessons I have had to learn is that facts are not all powerful. As a scientist, I love facts. A paleontologist tells me that there is a 365-million-year-old fishlike thing with eight fingers that is an ancient cousin to tetrapods? Amazing! Where can we find more like it?

Glenn Branch's picture
Posted on June 01, 2018 * Comments

NCSE conferred its Friend of Darwin award for 2018 upon two people—Robert Stephens and Tiffany Adrain—who have significantly contributed to efforts to increase the public’s understanding and appreciation of evolutionary biology in informal educational settings.

Robert Stephens, Molecular Biologist

Ann Reid's picture
Posted on June 01, 2018 * Comments

Each year, NCSE awards its Friend of the Planet award to individuals or organizations who have significantly contributed to efforts to increase the public’s understanding and appreciation of the science of climate change. This year’s winners have worked tirelessly to give the public the tools it needs to understand what scientists know about climate change and how they know it. 

Stephanie Keep's picture
Posted on March 28, 2018 * Comments

It can be tempting to oversimplify the problem of science denial and to vilify the groups we feel are responsible, but as a new report on Perceptions of Science in America from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences reminds us, this stuff is complicated.

Ann Reid's picture
Posted on March 05, 2018 * Comments

One of NCSE’s most important jobs is keeping an eye on statehouses across the country, using our decades of experience to decode the language of bills that have potential to undermine sound science education.