Posted on March 27, 2017 * Comments

For over a decade, NCSE has run an annual rafting trip down Grand Canyon as a counterpoint to the numerous creationist rafting trips that use Grand Canyon as a showcase for what they claim as the “evidences” of Noah’s Flood. Our NCSE trip presents the real science of the Canyon while addressing why the claims of creationists simply do not match what we see in the rocks. 

Posted on March 20, 2017 * Comments

I’m sure everybody reading this is as excited as I am for another dose of scientific literacy data. You may remember our last data update, where we revealed the exciting news of significant improvement in scientific literacy in Cedar Rapids over a six month time period. Now we’ve collected data for a year and can show you some cool numbers not only from Cedar Rapids, but now also from Iowa City.

Posted on March 14, 2017 * Comments

As you know, Science Booster Clubs improve community science literacy and provide grants to local teachers. But wait, there’s more! The Clubs are also creating a generation of scientists who work confidently with the public. Volunteering with Booster Clubs helps graduate students learn effective outreach skills.

Posted on March 06, 2017 * Comments

The March for Science will take place on April 22, 2017, in Washington DC, with satellite marches planned in more than 300 communities in more than thirty countries. The National Center for Science Education was one of the first organizations to endorse the march, and we are encouraging our members to take part. Why?

Posted on February 28, 2017 * Comments

As reported last week by Glenn Branch, NCSE board member Ben Santer was on Late Night with Seth Meyers this past Wednesday. If you haven’t watched it yet, please do so now—you won’t regret it.

Posted on February 24, 2017 * Comments

1001 Quotations coverA while ago, I wrote a blog post about a chunky volume entitled 1001 Ideas that Changed the Way We Think (2013), edited by Robert Arp. Although I contributed thirty-one brief articles on various scientific, philosophical, and cultural topics to the volume, nothing relevant to creationism and evolution was among them. But there was plenty in the book that was, from “Creation Myth” and “Miracles” and “Flat Earth Myth” through “Uniformitarianism” and “Geological Deep Time” and “Gradualism” to “Natural Selection,” “Last Universal Ancestor,” and “Sexual Selection” (all of which were credited to Darwin). As for the competition, “Christian Fundamentalism,” “The Genesis Flood,” and “Darwin’s Black Box” appeared as well. So a discussion of those articles seemed fitting for NCSE’s blog.

Posted on February 17, 2017 * Comments

A Global Warming Primer coverI’d like to invite you to take a moment to peruse the NCSE staff directory. One thing you’ll notice (after you note what an interesting bunch we are) is that there aren’t very many of us.

Posted on February 09, 2017 * Comments

Warren Overton

When it comes to modern young-earth creationist literature, there is, to coin a phrase, no new thing under the sun. The same old long-ago-debunked claims appear and reappear. I couldn’t be more jaded if I were a greenish metamorphic silicate. So when a colleague in North Carolina offered to send a copy of Kent Hovind’s booklet Help! I’m Being Taught Evolution in My Earth Science Class! (2008), I was willing to take a look, but I wasn’t expecting to find anything interesting. How wrong I was! The foreword to the book is by a Warren Overton (above)—who identifies himself as a son of the judge, William R. Overton (1939–1987), who presided over the trial in McLean v. Arkansas, the 1982 case in which Arkansas’s Balanced Treatment for Creation-Science and Evolution-Science Act was found to be unconstitutional.

Posted on February 01, 2017 * Comments
Let me tell you a story.
 
There is a little girl named Dora who is a member of my community. She likes me because I am not particularly strict, and because I am a reliable source of snacks. I teach her preschool class in our religious school. We play with letters from the aleph-bet and talk about the holidays and read stories. Last week I found a book I thought Dora would like, so I brought it to class.
Posted on January 24, 2017 * Comments

Do you remember the map I showed you in my last post, about how many states had volunteers interested in starting Science Booster Clubs? Spoiler alert! I received emails from people in 18 states interested in starting clubs. The first wave of volunteer-led clubs is getting off to a formal start at the end of January.