After last month’s Texas textbook vote, I was ready to declare total victory. I wrote:

It's a joy to be able to report on a sweeping victory for science education in Texas, and to be able to give an eyewitness report of the fight over the textbooks that will be used in that massive textbook market for years to come.

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Stand on the Congress Avenue Bridge in the evening, and you can watch millions of bats set forth across the Austin, Texas sky, freeing the city of mosquitoes. Walk north, and you’re surrounded by live music. Keep going until you reach the state capitol building, carved from native granite. Ponder the memorial to the Texans who died for the Confederacy. Cowboy hats, boots, and skinny jeans aren’t just for hipsters in this part of Austin. Pass the Chancery of the Diocese of Austin, and the statue of St. Francis commanding “Audite Verbum Dei”—“hear the word of God.” Half a block later, you’ve reached the headquarters of the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

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This is what I told the Texas board of education just minutes ago. As a reminder, NCSE's ability to represent your voice in hearings depends on your donations.


Madame Chair, members of the board,

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"Don't Mess With Textbooks!"I sent an email out to NCSE’s members in Texas about next Tuesday's hearing about textbooks before the Texas state board of education, but it occurs to me that some of you who read the blog and live in Texas may, inexplicably, not be members yet.

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