The past two weeks, I’ve been asking you on the Friday Forage to dive into the new website to find some of NCSE’s greatest historical writings. The first week’s forage had you searching for material on the Kitzmiller trial—kudos to Steve Bowden for foraging first! The next week’s forage was focused on NCSE’s position on science and religion. Congrats to Dan Hough for digging up that piece.

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Last week on Friday Forage, you had to explore NCSE’s new section on Legislation and Court Cases to meet our challenge. Kudos to the folks who found the Kitzmiller piece I was talking about. A prize is on its way!

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David Baum, a biologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, corresponded with NCSE staff about a challenge he and his colleagues faced. He shared this account of his experience trying to publish research which, in part, attempted to put certain creationist claims to the test.

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The half-finished cupWhen we got married, my wife and I set aside part of the cup of wine traditional in a Jewish service, to be finished when marriage was available to everyone. Days before our wedding, Judge Vaughn Walker had struck down marriage segregation in California, but that decision was on hold until last year, when the Supreme Court sustained his ruling.

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In his recent encyclical Laudato si’, Pope Francis argued the necessity of taking the long view in thinking about environmental ethics. I discussed the encyclical’s argument in part 1, and compared it to Aldo Leopold’s famous “The Land Ethic” in part 2.

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The encyclical Laudato si’ lays out what I called Pope Francis’s land ethic, back in part 1. I use that term because, from its earliest pages, I felt strong parallels between the environmental ethic advanced on behalf of the Catholic Church and the writings of pioneering American conservation biologist Aldo Leopold. Compare this passage from Laudato si’:

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