A few weeks ago, I gave you a polished slab of coral for Fossil Friday, thinking that the answer would be quite simple! I was told that it was obviously a Permian coral, specifically from the order Rugosa (aka horn coral).

+ read

It's like the ultimate movie monster: invisible, slowly creeping until it rears its ugly head, suddenly lashing out, disguised as dramatic extreme events, growing more powerful and destructive over time. It strikes fear and terror in the populace, causing some to deny its existence and others to weep and wail as they try to warn their friends and neighbors.

+ read

 

Last week on the Fossil Friday I gave you a really tough challenge...well, not that tough, but it was a plant, and plants are hard, apparently. So this week, I'm heading back over to the land of the animals, where we can bask in the glow of tibias and mandibles.  

So what is this week's fossil?  

+ read

With the polar vortex sweeping the nation, I thought I'd bring you a little greenery to brighten your day. Well, it was green a million years ago...or five million? Ten?

You tell me!  What was this festive plant, what epoch does it hail from, and if you are feeling particularly bold, where was this fossil found? First person to identify it gets bragging rights for the week!

+ read

Welcome back to Fossil Friday!  We had a great run in 2013: some vertebrates, lots of skulls, many formerly squishy things. To start us off for 2014, I thought I'd challenge you with this full skeleton. This fellow was an aquatic vertebrate, about the length of my hand. Who was this tiny swimmer? Where did it come from? What age did it live in?

+ read

I encountered this week's fossil at the AGU conference in San Francisco.  I love this peculiar specimen!  Is it a plant?  A seed?  An animal?  A fungus? Can you guess which era it dates from? 

When you take a good look at it, the answer is so obvious it might sting!  As always, the first person to identify it wins bragging rights for the week!

 

+ read

 

This past week, I had the opportunity to dive into piles of fossils at the exhibit hall at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. I was up to my neck in trilobites, coprolites, and polished coral. I figured many of these would be a little too easy for you, especially the coprolites (no offense), but I did find some really interesting and unique ones that might challenge your brain a bit.

+ read
Subscribe to Humor