This week on Fossil Friday, I bring you a fossil that you can really sink your teeth into! Or maybe this animal would have sunk its teeth into you!

This air-breathing marine reptile dates back to the Jurassic and was found in what is now the Sahara Desert. Although they are considered to be a distant relative of the Komodo Dragon, researchers now think they are even more closely related to snakes.

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This week on the Fossil Friday, I take you outside of the museum...many thousands of miles away, to an actual site in the desert. Josh Rosenau here at NCSE snapped this photo when he was traveling...where? I can't tell you! What is it? That is for you to figure out!

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I came into the office this morning and discovered someone had left mysterious little fossils on my desk. I think I can identify these fossils (although nailing the specific species may be tricky). Can you identify them?

How's that for a little mid-week mystery?

 

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These past few weeks on Fossil Friday, I have focused on bone crushers, biters, and scratchers—but have completely ignored the noble little animals that had their bones crushed...namely, food! 

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A few weeks ago, Patrick Moore, the co-founder of Greenpeace, testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee that climate change is not caused by human activity.  Since I am strictly forbidden to write blogs for NCSE entitled, “OMG, WTF?” or ”What kind of nutter sandwiches has this dude been eating?” (apparently that would be rude), I thought I’d point out some of the more illogical statements made in Moore’s testimony.  Let’s be honest: if we can’t have fun with this nonsense, then we will never survive.

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Last week, on the Fossil Friday, I gave you a mandible with promises of more to come. But then I had a sort of lousy, rainy week, and ended up wandering into the Pleistocene and like, wow, forget mandibles! I had a close encounter with some pretty awesome sea life. So apologies to those who had anticipated teeth and jaws and bone-crushers galore: those are on hold! 

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Last week, I shared a mandible and tooth fragment from an animal that I thought many of you would recognize. Many of you quickly surmised it was a canine of some sort, but which one?

This was a Tomarctus sp. in the Canidae family from the Miocene, found in what is now Nevada. From Prehistoric-Wildlife.com:

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This week on the Fossil Friday, I bring you a fossil that might be a little too easy! No, it's not a sloth, but it is a relative of an animal many of you might actually have sitting at your feet right now.

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