Last week’s winner of Fossil Friday, GrizzlyD, requested that we do a pseudofossil this week.

“I work at a museum and have to crush many hopes of ‘dinosaur eggs’ that are just round rocks,” he said.

But why would I give you a pseudofossil, when I have a giant archive of real fossils to work from?

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06.20.2014

This week on the Fossil Friday. I answer a special request from last week’s winner, Gerald Wilgus. Gerald thought we’ve had too many invertebrates lately, and maybe we should throw the vertebrate people a bone—no pun intended!

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Milestone 8 on the Upper Boston Post Road in Harvard Square, via Wikimedia Commons

The Discovery Institute’s Evolution News and Views blog was recently pleased that there are now five hundred reviews on Amazon.com for Stephen C. Meyer’s screed Darwin’s Doubt (2013). I don’t begrudge the anonymous author his or her pleasure.

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Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, Claremont, California. 

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In my introductory post, I presented one of many common mistakes made when speaking about evolution. I argued that writing and talking about evolution demands vigilance to avoid finicky issues. In that case, it was inferring a selection pressure for a given trait: Why might longer fingers be better than shorter ones?

Proving that even the MVPs of science can get it wrong when it comes to evolution,

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This whole month, Fossil Friday is “fossil by request.” Want to see a pile o’ marsupial teeth? Want me to dig into the La Brea tar pits? Are you an ammonite addict? Your wish is my command!

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05.26.2014

I hope everyone had a terrific Memorial Day weekend! This week’s fossil used to be green—but now is quite dark indeed, having been found in coal deposits in the mid-west. So what was this mystery plant?

It was a Lepidodendron. From Encyclopedia Britannica:

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