07.01.2016

Jan Bogumił Plersch, Fireworks in honor of Catherine II in 1787. Via Wikimedia Commons.

While a bunch of NCSE staff members are rafting down the majestic Colorado River and another is making his way to Washington DC for the National Education Association’s annual meeting and others are, presumably, moping Cinderella-fashion at home, we offer the following links for you to beguile the long fireworks-filled holiday weekend away.

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This blog installment focuses on perhaps the most well known example of natural selection in action (and a topic we have covered in the blog before): The peppered moth (Biston betularia).

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05.31.2016

We talk about cephalopods (such as squids, octopoduses [or octopodes, not octopi!]), and cuttlefish) a lot at NCSE. Not because we need to but because we like to. As regular readers know, while xenarthrans rule as my favorite all-time vertebrate group, cephalopods reign supreme in my heart among invertebrates.

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05.06.2016

Reading + mosquito netting + ancient Japan: booyah!

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05.06.2016

Wristbands reading "Teach Evolution"A few weeks ago, we got an unusual query. A company—RapidWristbands.com—that manufactures the sorts of wristbands made famous by Lance Armstrong, wanted to donate the profits from a recent order to NCSE.

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04.19.2016

A recent article in The New Yorker exposed some interesting aspects about why educational “reforms” often fail. Highlighting the efforts of a Bay Area private school system started by a former tech executive, the author, Rebecca Mead, gets into great detail of how the “disruption” that upended the cab and hotel industries across America, is a tougher road to tread with schools.

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04.08.2016

Rudolf Ernst’s “The Reader” via Wikimedia Commons

Whether you find someone to read them to you (as in Rudolf Ernst’s “The Reader”) or you read them yourself, we’ve found a nice selection of articles on evolution, climate change, and the history of science for you to while away the weekend. Enjoy! And let us know of your reactions and suggestions for future weeks in the comments section below.

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This lobster is a safe lobster. (Capes Treasures via Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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