05.06.2016

Wristbands reading "Teach Evolution"A few weeks ago, we got an unusual query. A company—RapidWristbands.com—that manufactures the sorts of wristbands made famous by Lance Armstrong, wanted to donate the profits from a recent order to NCSE. The order by a creationist group that I won’t bother to identify had been for over 100,000 bands instructing the wearer to “DEBUNK EVOLUTION.”

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04.19.2016

A recent article in The New Yorker exposed some interesting aspects about why educational “reforms” often fail. Highlighting the efforts of a Bay Area private school system started by a former tech executive, the author, Rebecca Mead, gets into great detail of how the “disruption” that upended the cab and hotel industries across America, is a tougher road to tread with schools.

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04.08.2016

Rudolf Ernst’s “The Reader” via Wikimedia Commons

Whether you find someone to read them to you (as in Rudolf Ernst’s “The Reader”) or you read them yourself, we’ve found a nice selection of articles on evolution, climate change, and the history of science for you to while away the weekend. Enjoy! And let us know of your reactions and suggestions for future weeks in the comments section below.

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This lobster is a safe lobster. (Capes Treasures via Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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03.25.2016

Fish nets with LED lights to save turtles: Photo: University of Exeter In which we look forward to the next century (yikes!) and back to the last. Also, turtles and dinosaurs.

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03.18.2016

What is actually going on in classrooms when it comes to climate change? I’m so glad you asked. This week, we recommend NCSE’s own latest report detailing the results of our national survey of middle and high school science teachers. Plus starfish, plus neanderthal sex, plus super clear climate change graphics. And eagles—finally a web site for people who don’t care about March Madness. Enjoy!

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03.15.2016

Hello, readers! It’s been a while. I have a good excuse, though: I’ve been busy putting together the second issue of the “new” Reports of the NCSE (RNCSE), which you will receive sometime in early-mid April. (That’s assuming you’re a member. You’re a member, right? If not, that can be fixed.) With that giant TO DO crossed off from my list, I found myself in the market for a good blog topic. I did what I always do what I need something, whether inspiration or completely esoteric quote attribution—I asked Glenn Branch.

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03.02.2016

If you’re a member of NCSE (and if you’re not, why not? You can join our mission here), you recently found in your mailbox the entirely redesigned Reports of the National Center for Science Education (affectionately known as RNCSE). I thought you might like to know the history of this major revamp.

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02.19.2016

Sweet Solitude, Edmund Blair Leighton, via Wikimedia Commons

Maybe you won’t be reading in the idyllic surroundings pictured by Edmund Leighton—even in the temperate San Francisco Bay Area, despite the data reflected in the last link below, it’s not nearly so balmy here right now—but the variety and depth of this week’s suggested reading will engross you just as much. Or so I hope!

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