Huh?

What is that I can’t even but just huh?

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A fossil!

From the Cambrian it came, Brain. (Is there an echo in here, Pinky?) Do the same thing you do every night, er, week, and leave your best guess about the identity of this fossil in the comments section below. The first person to do so correctly will have NCSE’s best wishes for his or her attempt to try to take over the world.

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Fossils!

These were the teeth of a xenacanth, genus Orthacanthus: a freshwater shark found from the Devonian to the Permian—400 million years ago to 250 million years ago. Timothy J. Bradley, who wrote and illustrated the excellent children’s book Paleo Sharks: Survival of the Strangest (2007), explains:

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Fossils!

My, what great big teeth you have! And double-fanged, too! Be the first correctly to identify the possessor of these pearly whites in the comments below and be the object of ever new and increasing admiration and awe.

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A fossil!

It’s the ophiuroid Geocoma carinata! (Synonyms include Ophiocten kelheimense, Ophiopinna derecta, Ophiopsammus kelheimens, Sinosura derecta, Sinosura kelheimense, and Sinosura kelheimensis, so give yourself partial credit if you mentioned any of them, but not full credit, since these are all now defunct names.)

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A fossil!

From the Jurassic it came! But what is it? If you think you know the answer, write it on a postcard or a 300 kV FEI Titan Themis scanning/transmission electron microscope and a FEI Quanta 3D FIB/SEM dual-beam focused ion beam instrument—my eyesight isn’t what it used to be, and I think I may need the bifocals—and mail them to NCSE, 1904 Franklin Street, Suite 600, Oakland CA 94612. Or just leave a comment below.

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