We asked applicants for the NCSE Grand Canyon Teacher Scholarship to explain, in 500 words, what lessons or knowledge they expected to gain from rafting the Grand Canyon, to enrich their students’, colleagues’, and neighbors’ understanding of evolution, deep time, climate change, and the natural world. Here is part of scholarship winner Brandon Haught’s explanation of what he hopes to bring back from the Grand Canyon to his Orange City, FL, high school.

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My day as a "scientist in the classroom" was a fun, collaborative experience with Robin Bulleri, an energetic AP Biology teacher, and her awesome class. Once we were connected through NCSE's Scientists in the Classroom program, Robin and I discussed what aspect of evolution I would cover with her class. As a visiting scientist, we decided it made the most sense for me to talk about the tools and evidence that scientists use to study evolution.

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Aw.Cute lemur videos, the next internet craze. You read it here first.

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I have a few erasable white boards on my desk that I use to keep track of, well, everything. Although they are frequently commandeered by my 5-year-old to practice her letters, the boards do a pretty good job of reminding me of all I have to do. In one corner is a list of languishing blog topics. Among them, “Stated Clearly.” I can’t remember how these two words came to be on my to-blog list, but there they have sat for some time.

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Well-established by now on this blog is my love for and obsession with xenarthrans. So let it be a sign of my devotion to getting the upcoming issue of RNCSE out on time and full of awesome that I allowed not one but two xenarthran stories in the news to pass without comment. This then is the first of my xenarthran catch-up posts.

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Cards, showing all four suitsImage by Enoch Lau, via Wikimedia Commons under a CC-BY-SA license. Take a card deck (no jokers). Pull out a card. What’s the probability that you’ll see a spade?

25%, right?

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"Darwin" tells us about his voyage.

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A month or so back, NCSE got an e-mail from John Pollock asking if we'd be interested in reviewing his new app, and it somehow ended up in my lap. Now, I’m not really an app person, but this app was right up my alley: The Darwin Synthetic Interview. Basically, Pollock and his colleagues have brought Darwin to life—on our portable devices, anyway—and made it possible for us to ask him questions.

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