Theodosius Dobzhansky’s “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution” is my favorite science quote, as it sums up perfectly how important evolution is to our understanding of biology. Unfortunately, in far too many schools evolution is not taught all, or not taught to its full extent. When it comes to human evolution in particular, the statistics are even more depressing.

+ read

David Baum, a biologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, corresponded with NCSE staff about a challenge he and his colleagues faced. He shared this account of his experience trying to publish research which, in part, attempted to put certain creationist claims to the test.

+ read

This week in Iowa we started advertising for NCSE’s Science Booster Club Project summer camp. We are really excited about this camp, which will give local kids, especially those from rural school districts, the opportunity to participate in a week-long daycamp. We’re going to go to museums, tour state and university labs, and meet lots of real scientists doing their real scientist thing. We’ll also go on hikes to do some observational work of our own, learning about both of extant and extinct local ecosystems through exploration of our

+ read

Today I got to do two of my favorite things: think about how people learn science and walk in the woods. I was walking in the woods with a purpose, checking out the location for an upcoming Science Booster Club nature hike. These community nature hikes have been surprisingly popular; we’ve beat our expected turnout every time. At first we had experienced botanists lead these hikes and give more or less walking lectures, but now our crowds have become too big for this treatment. I was testing the trail for a group that had fifty families attend their last group nature hike.

+ read

As in parts 1, 2, and 3, we’re having a roundtable discussion of Joseph T. Spadafino’s “Americans’ Unwillingness to Accept Evolution En Masse Is a Failure of Science Education,” posted at (although later withdrawn from) the Huffington Post.

+ read

As in parts 1 and 2, we’re having a roundtable discussion about Joseph T. Spadafino’s “Americans’ Unwillingness to Accept Evolution En Masse Is a Failure of Science Education,” posted at (although later withdrawn from) the Huffington Post.

+ read

As explained in part 1, we’re having a roundtable discussion of Joseph T. Spadafino’s “Americans’ Unwillingness to Accept Evolution En Masse Is a Failure of Science Education,” posted at (although later withdrawn from) the Huffington Post.

+ read

A couple of weeks ago, I was strolling through an airport on my way to visit friends in D.C. when I spotted a tweet by Amanda Glaze (@EvoPhD) regarding a post on the HuffPost Education blog about evolution education. Amanda wrote: “I would have loved to have been consulted on this piece, or perhaps @Paleophile or @icbinns. Problem is complex.” The post, by Huffington Post contributor Joseph T. Spadafino, is now unavailable (more on that below), but a cached version can be found if you do some digging.

+ read

Natural selection is part of every state’s high school science standards, but that doesn’t mean we teachers are always successful in connecting our students with the topic. If your students are like mine, I’m sure you get some disconcerting responses when you ask them to explain how a feature of a species, like the dark color of peppered moths, could have evolved by natural selection. For example, one student wrote, “The moth most likely changed color due to the fact that its environment did as well.

+ read
Subscribe to Evolution education