You remember the Science League of America, don’t you? Founded by the polymath Maynard Shipley (shown here) in 1924, it fought antievolution legislation, helped teachers discharged for teaching evolution, argued for evolution in articles and letters to the editor in magazines and newspapers, lectured and organized meetings all over the country, and basically served as “a vast clearing-house and information bureau” with respect to the teaching of evolution—the NCSE of its day, really, which is part of the reason that NCSE’s blog is named in its honor. Additionally, in 1925, the Science League of America conducted a prize contest on the evergreen topic, “Why Evolution Should Be Taught in Our Schools Instead of the Book of Genesis.” And thereby hangs a tale, which Shipley (partly) tells in The War on Modern Science (1927).

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In late 2012, GQ magazine asked Florida’s Senator Marco Rubio, “How old do you think the Earth is?”

He answered “4.55 billion years” and no one ever talked about it again.

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I have no expectation that televangelist Pat Robertson cares what I think. It’s even possible that, when it comes to creationism, his interests and mine may not be in full alignment.

But I think he should take Answers in Genesis and noted Ark enthusiast Ken Ham up on this offer:

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This week’s Cosmos episode, “The Lost Worlds of Planet Earth,” was an extraordinary tour of geologic ideas, exposing television audiences to fascinating events most had probably never heard of. Neil deGrasse Tyson’s fact-rich explanations enlightened and informed even as they entertained the eye with dramatic visualizations.

joggins nova scotia

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Charlie Oredigger, the Montana Tech mascot
Charlie Oredigger, the Montana Tech mascot, taking a swing at creationism.
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Last Sunday the second episode of Neil deGrasse Tyson’s new Cosmos series aired. From the perspective of the evolution-creationism controversy, it was a doozy.

cosmos

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A couple of weeks ago I was interviewed by the hosts of the NonTheology podcast, and that recording is now online. We spoke for a little over an hour on three topics: the Bill Nye-Ken Ham “debate” (which had taken place two days before), the nature of creationist opposition to evolution education, and ideas about human uniqueness. Check it out!

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Crystal Disco. ballA Crystal disco ball to celebrate the crystal anniversary of the Disco. 'tute's entry into the creationism business.
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Last time we examined what creationists think about how the rocks of Grand Canyon were formed. Now we’re going to look at the fatal flaws in this creationist model, and why it doesn’t fit with what we see in Grand Canyon.

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