You are here

Cradle of Life: The Discovery of Earth's Earliest Fossils

by J. William Schopf
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2001. 392 pages.

"This book chronicles an amazing breakthrough in biologic and geologic science," Schopf writes, "the discovery of a vast, ancient, missing fossil record that extends life's roots to the most remote reaches of the geologic past. At long last, after a century of unrewarded search, the earliest 85% of the history of life on Earth has been uncovered to forever change our understanding of how evolution works." Writes the reviewer for Scientific American, "Schopf ... has a good deal to say about scientists and the way science is done.

Genesis and Geology

by Charles Coulston Gillispie
Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996. 351 pages.

Subtitled "A study in the relations of scientific thought, natural theology, and social opinion in Great Britain, 1790–1850," Genesis and Geology "proposed to give an account of the immediate background of the pattern of scientific disagreement which culminated in disputes about Darwin's book and to attempt to analyze the causes of that disagreement." Originally published in 1951, Genesis and Geology was reprinted by Harvard University Press in 1996, with a new introduction by the historian of geology Nicolaas Rupke reevaluating the book in light of the subseque

The Age of the Earth

by Brent Dalrymple
Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1994. 492 pages.

The Age of the Earth begins with a plain answer: "Four and one-half billion years." But keep reading! Dalrymple's comprehensive, authoritative, and altogether magisterial account of the methods used to determine the age of the earth is, according to the reviewer for The Quarterly Review of Biology, "an enormously important book written by an expert for the general scientific public.

Pages

Subscribe to Paleontology & Geology