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Noah's Flood: The Genesis Story in Western Thought

by Norman Cohn
New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999. 168 pages.

With the aid of 75 illustrations, including 20 color plates, the distinguished medieval historian Norman Cohn explores the origins, development, and variety of interpretations of the familiar tale of the Noachian deluge.

When the Great Abyss Opened

by J. David Pleins
New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. 242 pages.

In his lively, ambitious, and engaging study, Pleins — Professor of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University — investigates the cultural significance of the story of Noah's flood, discussing the connections and conflicts among geology, archeology, myth, literature, the Bible, and popular culture. (A chapter is devoted to "Fundamentalist literalism and 'creation science'.") Michael Ruse writes, "This fascinating book opens up a completely new light on a topic about which we all think we know something and about which we learn we knew very little.

Darwinism Defeated? The Johnson-Lamoureux Debate on Biological Origins

by Phillip E Johnson & Denis O Lamoureux
Vancouver, BC: Regent College Publishing, 1999. 180 pages.

Phillip Johnson, the law school professor who has written a series of anti-evolution books beginning with Darwin on Trial squares off against Denis Lamoureux, a University of Alberta theologian and biologist who studies dental development and evolution. In this book, Lamoureux brings his scientific knowledge to bear as he challenges Johnson's views on how Christians ought to respond to the theory of evolution.

Finding Darwin's God

by Kenneth R. Miller
New York: Harper Perennial, 1999. 338 pages.

Subtitled "A scientist's search for common ground between God and evolution," Finding Darwin's God is a perennial favorite. Francisco J. Ayala writes, "Finding Darwin's God is an artfully constructed argument against both those who deny evolution and those using science to justify a materialist worldview. Yet it is a book for all readers. I know of no other that would surpass it in being mindful of different views, while still forceful.

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