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Encyclopedia of Evolution

by Stanley A Rice
New York: Checkmark Books, 2007. 468 pages.

Reviewing Encyclopedia of Evolution for RNCSE, Tim M Berra wrote, "It is not often that one reads an encyclopedia from cover to cover, but this task was more enjoyable than onerous. ... Rice's coverage is broad, interesting, relevant, and informative. If you want examples of Convergent Evolution or a primer on Cladistics, Coevolution, or Creationism, this is a good place to begin. Reading this book would be excellent preparation for graduate school general exams.

Icons of Evolution: An Encyclopedia of People, Evidence, and Controversies

edited by Brian Regal
Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2007. 720 pages.

From the publisher: "Students and the general public are frequently confronted with contradictory and confusing claims about the people, ideas, and artifacts that were essential in the development of the science of evolution. Where can they find accurate and understandable information on these important concepts? Icons of Evolution comprises twenty-four in-depth essays on the most famous ideas, artifacts, people and places of evolutionary biology.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Evolution

edited by Mark D Pagel
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 1205 pages.

A monumental reference work, with over 1300 pages in two volumes, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Evolution presents the essentials of evolutionary biology in 370 original articles written by leading experts, accompanied with hundreds of tables, charts, graphs, maps, and other illustrations, as well as bibliographies, cross-references, and an index. The reviewer for Trends in Ecology & Evolution concluded, "Throughout the diverse contributions, a strong case could be made that the authors are among the best that could have been chosen to describe their respective fields.

Keywords in Evolutionary Biology

edited by Evelyn Fox Keller and Elisabeth A Lloyd
Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998. 432 pages.

The editors of Keywords in Evolutionary Biology commissioned leading biologists, historians of biology, and philosophers of science to explain in detail a host of concepts central to evolutionary biology, from adaptation to unit of selection. The book includes essays by Richard Dawkins, Stephen Jay Gould, Daniel J Kevles, Motoo Kimura, Philip Kitcher, Michael Ruse, Elliott Sober, Mary Jane West-Eberhard, and David Sloan Wilson.

The Story of Life

by Richard Southwood
New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. 272 pages.

The Story of Life, based on the eminent zoologist Richard Southwood's lectures to first-year students at Oxford University, manages to review the history of life, from its earliest beginnings to the present day — and it even offers a glimpse into the future. It is generously illustrated with line drawings and maps, too! "This remarkable book succeeds, within less than 300 pages, in summarizing everything essential about all living creatures for more than three billion years.

The Tree of Life: A Phylogenetic Classification

by Guillaume Lecointre and Hervé Le Guyader
Cambridge: Belknap Press, 2006. 560 pages.

Reviewing The Tree of Life for RNCSE, Kevin Padian wrote, "The Tree of Life is a terrific compendium of the conclusions of thirty years of research and standardization by thousands of scientists around the globe. It is clearly written, logically organized, and beautifully illustrated. In short, it is one-stop shopping for anyone with questions about where a given group of organisms fits on the tree of life, what characteristics put it there, and how we know all this. ...

The Book of Life: An Illustrated History of the Evolution of Life on Earth, second edition

edited by Stephen Jay Gould
New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2001. 256 pages.

The Book of Life, now in its second edition, provides nothing less than it promises in its title: a detailed account of the history of life on earth over the last four billion years. J John Seposki Jr, Michael Benton, Christine Janis, Christopher Stringer, and Peter Andrews, under the general editorship of NCSE Supporter Stephen Jay Gould, are responsible for the thoroughly understandable text; the vivid and compelling illustrations are the work of John Barber, Marianne Collins, Ely Kish, Akio Marishima, and Jean-Paul Tibbles.

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