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From DNA to Diversity: Molecular Genetics and the Evolution of Animal Design

by Sean B. Carroll, Jennifer K. Grenier, and Scott D. Weatherbee
Oxford: Blackwell Science, 2001. 192 pages.

"Animals diverge from common ancestry through changes in their DNA, but what are the genes that control morphology?" That is the question that From DNA to Diversity seeks to investigate by synthesizing evolutionary biology with genetics and embryology. "With almost poetic ease, the authors tell a highly complex story without distorting its scientific substance.

At Home in the Universe

by Stuart A Kauffman
New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. 336 pages.

"The emerging sciences of complexity begin to suggest," Kauffman writes, "that the order [of the biological world] is not at all accidental, that vast veins of spontaneous order lie at hand. Laws of complexity spontaneously generate much of the order of the natural world. ...

Symbiotic Planet

by Lynn Margulis
New York: Basic Books, 2000. 176 pages.

In Symbiotic Planet, a book in the Science Masters series of popularizations, Lynn Margulis argues that symbiosis is crucial to the emergence of evolutionary novelty, from the eukaryotic cell to, controversially, the planet itself.

Speciation

by Jerry A. Coyne and H. Allen Orr
Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, 2004. 545 pages.

Speciation is again at the forefront of evolutionary research, and Jerry A. Coyne and H. Allen Orr's Speciation is a unified, critical, and up-to-date account of the scientific research relevant to the origin of species. Reviewing the book in RNCSE (2005 May-Aug; 25 [3-4]: 40-41), Norman A Johnson wrote, "Jerry Coyne and Allen Orr, who have alone and together made several seminal discoveries in speciation, have written a magisterial, comprehensive volume ...

Endless Forms: Species and Speciation

edited by Daniel J. Howard and Stewart H. Berlocher
New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. 484 pages.

The publisher writes, "This volume presents the newest research findings on speciation bringing readers up to date on species concepts, modes of speciation, and the nature of reproductive barriers.

Darwin's Dreampond: Drama on Lake Victoria

by Tijs Goldschmidt
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996. 280 pages.

Like the finches of the Galápagos, the cichlids of Lake Victoria have descended from a recent common ancestor, and radiated, spectacularly, across the range of available ecological niches. In Darwin's Dreampond, Tijs Goldschmidt not only explains the evolution and the ecology of the Lake Victoria cichlids, but also engagingly relates his adventures and misadventures as a researcher in the field. Mark Ridley comments, "The biological story itself is fascinating, and Mr Goldschmidt tells it well.

Evolution in Hawaii

by Steve Olson
Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2004. 56 pages.

Intended as a supplement to Teaching about Evolution and the Nature of Science, Evolution in Hawaii focuses on the Hawaiian islands as laboratories of evolution in the wild. Included is a speciation exercise in which, as the preface describes it, "Using real genetic data from 18 species of Drosophila flies in Hawaii, students draw evolutionary trees depicting the relationships of the species and investigate the link between speciation and the ages of the Hawaiian islands.

Evolution 101

by Randy Moore and Janice Moore
Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2006. 240 pages.

Randy Moore and Janice Moore's Evolution 101 aims, in the words of its publisher, to provide "readers — whether students new to the field or just interested members of the lay public — with the essential ideas of evolution using a minimum of jargon and mathematics." It succeeds marvelously.

The Making of the Fittest

by Sean B. Carroll
New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2006. 301 pages.

In the preface to The Making of the Fittest, Sean B. Carroll writes, "With DNA science penetrating so many facets of everyday life, it is again time for a new departure and to seek facts of a new kind. My goal in this book is to present a body of new facts about evolution gathered from DNA evidence. ...

The Top 10 Myths About Evolution

by Cameron M. Smith and Charles Sullivan
Amherst: Prometheus Books, 2006. 200 pages.

From the publisher: "In this concise, accessible, 'myth-buster's handbook,' educators Cameron M Smith and Charles Sullivan clearly dispel the ten most common myths about evolution, which continue to mislead average Americans. Using a refreshing, jargon-free style, they set the record straight on claims that evolution is 'just a theory,' that Darwinian explanations of life undercut morality, that Intelligent Design is a legitimate alternative to conventional science, that humans come from chimpanzees, and six other popular but erroneous notions.

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