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The Big Golden Book of Dinosaurs

by Robert T. Bakker, illustrated by Luis V. Rey

New York: Golden Books, 2013. 64 pages.

 “I have mixed feelings about The Big Golden Book of Dinosaurs,” reviewer Daniel Loxton concludes. “I feel that it calls for a certain amount of caution, but I long to recommend it for its energy, and the depth of its ideas, and the poetry of its storytelling. Kids could do much worse than to dig into a book that so eloquently describes the place of the dinosaurs in the broader tapestry of animal life and geologic time.”

Where Did Dinosaurs Come From?

by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld

New York: HarperCollins, 2011. 40 pages.

From the publisher: "Stegosaurus had spikes along its back. Triceratops had long, sharp horns. Tyrannosaurus rex was enormous. Millions and millions of years before the first people lived, these fascinating creatures ruled the Earth. To find out where they came from, you have to look way back in time . . . 3.5 billion years ago! Come explore the biggest mystery of all: Where did dinosaurs come from? Read and find out!" 

Darwin: A Graphic Biography

by Eugene Byrne and Simon Gurr

Washington (DC): Smithsonian Books, 2013. 100 pages.

Reviewer Daniel J. Glass writes, "Darwin: A Graphic Biography ... is, as its name suggests, a biography of the renowned scientist in graphic novel form, and it can be confidently added to the burgeoning library of such works that can be of great benefit to grade school classrooms learning about science and science history.

The Leakeys: A Biography

by Mary Bowman-Kruhm

Amherst (NY): Prometheus Books, 2010. 181 pages.
 

While applauding Mary Bowman-Kruhm for her attempt to convey the paleoanthropological contributions of the Leakey family to middle-school students, reviewer Elizabeth Lawlor was unimpressed with the result: “How, then, is it possible to write a boring book about the Leakeys for middle-school students and their teachers?

Children of Time: Evolution and the Human Story

by Anne H. Weaver

Albuquerque (NM): University of New Mexico Press, 2012. 192 pages.
 

“Anne Weaver’s Children of Time just happens to be the first material I’ve professionally reviewed that’s honest about whom the scientific study of human origins and evolution is actually for,” writes reviewer Holly M. Dunsworth: “the kids and the kids-at-heart of the world. And this book nails it.

Charlie and Kiwi: An Evolutionary Adventure

by Eileen Campbell
New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2011. Unpaginated.

The companion volume to the New York Hall of Science’s Charlie and Kiwi’s Evolutionary Adventure exhibit, Charlie and Kiwi seeks “to engage children from seven years old and up in learning about the basics of evolution—variation, inheritance, selection, time, and adaptation—using bird evolution as the main example,” writes reviewer Alan D. Gishlick.

The Lucy Man: The Scientist Who Found the Most Famous Fossil Ever!

by C. A. P. Saucier
Amherst (NY): Prometheus Books, 2011. 136 pages.

Reviewer Tom Wanamaker writes, “Don Johanson is a major figure in the field of science and this book should give anyone, expert or beginner, a better appreciation of the man and his work.

Animals Charles Darwin Saw

by Sandra Markle
San Francisco (CA): Chronicle Books, 2009. 45 pages.

For his part, reviewer Ben Roberts found Animals Charles Darwin Saw to be clearly written if sometimes dry, punctuated with interesting anecdotes, and ornamented with colorful and interesting illustrations, although the map of the voyage of the Beagle should have been more prominent. Fourth-grade children to whom he read the book enjoyed the anecdotes but regarded Darwin unappealing as a person (“just some crazy dude”), and Roberts concluded that “Markle could ha

Darwin: With Glimpses into his Private Journal & Letters

by Alice B. McGinty
Boston: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children, 2009. 48 pages.

Reviewer Louise S. Mead recommends both of these books about Darwin’s life and work, aimed at children ages 6 to 9, both of which appealingly incorporate excerpts from Darwin’s journals. What Mr. Darwin Saw “is a fun picture book [with] ...

What Mr. Darwin Saw

by Mick Manning and Brita Granström
London: Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, 2009. 48 pages.

Reviewer Louise S. Mead recommends both of these books about Darwin’s life and work, aimed at children ages 6 to 9, both of which appealingly incorporate excerpts from Darwin’s journals. What Mr. Darwin Saw “is a fun picture book [with] ...

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