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Nature’s Clocks: How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything

by Doug Macdougall
Berkeley (CA): University of California Press, 2008. 288 pages.

“In Nature’s Clocks,” writes reviewer John W Geissman, “Doug Macdougall provides an exceptionally well-written and engaging description ... of how we know what we know about absolute age determinations and thus about our attempts to unravel the uncertainties of deep time.

Darwin’s Pictures: Views of Evolutionary Theory, 1837– 1874

by Julia Voss
New Haven (CT): Yale University Press, 2010. 340 pages.

Reviewer Keith Thomson summarizes, “As Darwin was a poor draftsman, Julia Voss’s Darwin’s Pictures is not a critical retrospective of the man as an artist.

The Art of Evolution

edited by Barbara Larson and Fae Brauer
Hanover (NH): Dartmouth College Press, 2009. 332 pages.

In examining these two books on visual elements in Darwin’s work, reviewer Michael Ruse notes that the Origin, with its single illustration, was the exception: “In other works, there are illustrations galore, and only a fool (or a philosopher) could deny their importance.” Darwin’s Camera “does a magnificent job of tracing and explaining Darwin’s illustrations” to The Descent of Man, “giving great detail about the sources of the pictures and their

Darwin’s Camera: Art and Photography in the Theory of Evolution

by Phillip Prodger
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. 284 pages.

In examining these two books on visual elements in Darwin’s work, reviewer Michael Ruse notes that the Origin, with its single illustration, was the exception: “In other works, there are illustrations galore, and only a fool (or a philosopher) could deny their importance.” Darwin’s Camera “does a magnificent job of tracing and explaining Darwin’s illustrations” to The Descent of Man, “giving great detail about the sources of the pictures and their

The Annotated Origin

annotated by James T. Costa
Cambridge (MA): Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2009. 576 pages.

According to reviewer Allen D. MacNeill, “The introduction to The Annotated Origin alone is worth the price of the book” for its biography of Darwin and its discussion of Darwin’s rush to publish in 1859.

The Origin Then and Now: An Interpretive Guide to the Origin of Species

by David N. Reznick
Princeton (NJ): Princeton University Press, 2010. 432 pages.

“There is clearly a need for the general public to understand what Darwin did or did not say,” reviewer Piers J.

Lincoln & Darwin: Shared Visions of Race, Science, and Religion

by James Lander
Carbondale (IL): Southern Illinois University Press, 2010. 351 pages.

“As the subtitle suggests,” reviewer Steven Conn explains, “Lander’s approach to this well-worked material is to focus on three areas—race, science and religion—and argue that these two men shared the same outlook on all three.

The Darwin Experience

by John van Wyhe
Washington (DC): National Geographic Press, 2008. 64 pages.

Reviewer Michael D.

Here Be Dragons

by Dennis McCarthy
New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. 256 pages.

A spirited and readable survey of the history of biogeography, Here Be Dragons teems in accounts of unusual animals and exotic locales. The publisher writes, “The story of how animals and plants came to be found where they are — the story of biogeography — brings together two great theories of life and Earth: evolution and plate tectonics.

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