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Science and Religion, Methodology and Humanism

by Eugenie C. Scott

[In May 1998 Dr Eugenie C Scott, NCSE'S Executive Director, was awarded the American Humanist Association's 1998 "Isaac Asimov Science Award". What follows is excerpted from her acceptance speech. Ed.]

In late 1995, the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) issued a statement to its members and the public concerning the importance of evolution to biology teaching. Part of the statement defined evolution:

Science Education, Scientists, and Faith

Title: 
Science Education, Scientists, and Faith
Author(s): 
Mike Salovesh
Issue: 
2
Anthropologist Mike Salovesh received a letter about the potential exposure of a high-school student only to evolution in classes in public schools and university. He has allowed us to reprint his reflections on the place of evolution in the social and life sciences and on the relationship between science and religion.

The concerned parent wrote:

Year: 
1998
Date: 
March–April
Page(s): 
28–29
This version might differ slightly from the print publication.

Creationists and the Pope's Statement

by Eugenie C. Scott



This essay originally appeared in The Quarterly Review of Biology 72.4, December 1997.

Do Scientists Really Reject God?

Title: 
Do Scientists Really Reject God?: New Poll Contradicts Earlier Ones
Author(s): 
Eugenie C Scott
NCSE Executive Director
Issue: 
2
In a recent issue of RNCSE, Larry Witham reported on research he and historian Edward Larson carried out to investigate the religious beliefs of scientists.They had surveyed a sample of 1000 individuals listed in American Men and Women of Science, (AM&WS), using questions originally asked by the Gallup organization in a series of polls of American religious views.The report, entitled "Many scientists see God's hand in evolution", concluded that although scientists were quite different from other Americans in their views of "extreme" positions— such as young earth cr
Year: 
1997
Date: 
March–April
Page(s): 
24–25
This version might differ slightly from the print publication.

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