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Origin of Polonium Halos

Title: 
Origin of Polonium Halos
Author(s): 
Lorence G Collins &nbsp &nbsp Barbara J Collins
Issue: 
5

INTRODUCTION

It has been more than twelve years since we (Collins 1988, 1997b; Hunt and others 1992) discussed Robert Gentry’s hypothesis proposing that polonium (Po) halos and granite were created nearly instantaneously on Day Three of the Genesis Week (Gen 1:9–10; Gentry 1965, 1970, 1974, 1983, 1988). It is worth examining new information pertinent to the origin of polonium halos. Gentry points out that most granite petrologists believe that all granite bodies of large size are formed deep in the earth’s crust from magma (molten rock)

Year: 
2010
Date: 
September-October
Page(s): 
11–16
About the Author(s): 

Lorence G Collins is a retired professor of geology at California State University, Northridge, who has written extensively to promote general knowledge about geology and to counter arguments by anti-evolutionists, including four other articles for RNCSE, which can be found at California State University, Northridge. [Internet]

Barbara J Collins has taught biology at California Lutheran University for 47 years. She has a PhD in geology from the University of Illinois and was the first woman to earn a PhD in geology at this university.

AUTHORS’ ADDRESSES
Lorence G Collins
Geoscience Department
California State University Northridge
18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge CA 91330
lorencec@sysmatrix.net

Barbara J Collins
Biology Department
California Lutheran University
60 Olsen Road
Thousand Oaks CA 91360
bcollins@clunet.edu

topics: 
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