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Evolution and the Humanities

Year: 
1988
Number: 
2
Quarter: 
Spring
Page(s): 
33–36
Reviewer: 
Arthur M. Shapiro
This version might differ slightly from the print publication.
Title: 
Evolution and the Humanities

Our campus library sends around a monthly list of recent acquisitions as a service to the academic departments. This past month a book called Evolution and the Humanities materialized on the list. Given my posts on the local Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science and the special task force striving to redefine the goals of a University of California education (including "scientizing the humanists" as well as "humanizing the scientists"), I literally ran to the library to find out what this book was about.

Author(s): 
David Holbrook
Aldershot, Hampshire, U.K.: Gower Publishing Company, 1987. 228 pages.
About the Author(s): 
Arthur M. Shapiro is professor and vice-chairperson of the Zoology Department at the University of California at Davis.

Review: Creation's Tiny Mystery

Year: 
1988
Number: 
2
Quarter: 
Spring
Page(s): 
30–33
Reviewer: 
Philip Osmon
This version might differ slightly from the print publication.
Title: 
Creation's Tiny Mystery
Author(s): 
Robert V. Gentry

For many years, creationist Robert Gentry has claimed that he's uncovered scientific evidence of a miraculous event. Gentry says that this evidence, halos of a very short-lived isotope (Polonium 218) which lack the inner halo of a longer-lived radioactive parent, undermines the uniformitarian principle. He believes that these halos, "God's fingerprint," demonstrate that natural laws were suspended in the past. He also claims that other miracles occurred in four "singularities," or sets of miraculous events, which are described in the Bible.

Knoxville, TN: Earth Science Associates, 1986. 316 pages.
About the Author(s): 
Philip Osmon is an associate editor of Creation/Evolution and has worked as a science writer.

Review: Forbidden Archaeology's Impact

Year: 
1999
Issue: 
3
Title: 
Forbidden Archeology's Impact: How a Controversial New Book Shocked the Scientific Community and Became an Underground Classic

What if somebody published a 592-page book to answer all the critics of his previous book? That's what Michael Cremo does in Forbidden Archaeology's Impact. In 1993, Cremo and Richard Thompson published Forbidden Archaeology (FA), a voluminous exposé of "anomalous archaeological artifacts" that suggested modern people possibly lived on earth almost as long as the world existed, some 4.3 billion years ago.

Date: 
May–June
Author(s): 
Michael A. Cremo
Badger, CA: Torchlight Publishing, 1998. 592 pages.
Page(s): 
14–17
Reviewer: 
Tom Morrow
About the Author(s): 
Tom Morrow
662 Hogskin Valley Rd
Washburn TN 37888-1735
Media Type: 
This version might differ slightly from the print publication.
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