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Creationist board chair out in Texas

The Texas Senate voted not to confirm Don McLeroy in his post as chair of the Texas state board of education on May 28, 2009.

"Don't mess with textbooks"

Joshua RosenauJoshua Rosenau

Writing in Seed, NCSE's Joshua Rosenau explains what the new Texas state science standards mean for science education nationwide.

ICR sues THECB

The Institute for Creation Research Graduate School filed suit over the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board's decision to deny the ICR's request for a state certificate of authority to offer a master's degree in science education.

Consequences of the flawed standards in Texas?

Since the March 2009 decision of the Texas state board of education to adopt a set of flawed state science standards, media coverage has increasingly emphasized the possible consequences.

White House science advisor deplores Texas standards

John HoldrenJohn Holdren

John Holdren, the head of the White House Office of Science and Technology, told the ScienceInsider blog (April 8, 2009) that the recent adoption in Texas of a flawed set of state science standards was "a step backward."

Comer case dismissed

Chris ComerChris Comer

In a March 31, 2009, decision, Chris Comer's lawsuit against the Texas Education Agency, challenging the agency's policy of requiring neutrality about evolution and creationism, was dismissed. The Austin American-Statesman (April 1, 2009) reported, "The state's attorneys argued in court filings that the agency is allowed to bar its employees from giving the appearance that the agency is taking positions on issues that the State Board of Education must decide, such as the content of the science curriculum."

A setback for science education in Texas

At its March 25-27, 2009, meeting, the Texas state board of education voted to adopt a flawed set of state science standards, which will dictate what is taught in science classes in elementary and secondary schools, as well as provide the material for state tests and textbooks, for the next decade.

Science setback for Texas schools

PRESS RELEASE

"Somebody's got to stand up to experts!" cries board chair
Don McLeroy.

OAKLAND — After three all-day meetings and a blizzard of amendments and counter-amendments, the Texas Board of Education cast its final vote Friday on state science standards. The results weren't pretty.

"Strengths and weaknesses" nixed in Texas again

The Texas state board of education again narrowly voted against a proposal to restore the controversial "strengths and weaknesses" language to the set of state science standards now under review.

Texas needs to get it right

As the Texas state board of education prepares for its final vote on a new set of state science standards, no fewer than fifty-four scientific and educational societies are calling for the approval of the standards as originally submitted — without misleading language about "strengths and weaknesses" and without the flawed amendments undermining the teaching of evolution proposed at the board's January 2009 meeting.

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