Texas

At the public hearings on textbook adoption at the Texas Board of Education on September 17, there was an exchange that deserves to be noted. I mean, there were plenty of noteworthy exchanges, but most of the rest of them were on the crazy side. But this particular exchange deserves to be noted because at first glance, it might seem easy which side to support. Whereas upon reflection, the other side is actually the more valid position.

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09.30.2013

The creationists and climate change deniers reviewing biology textbooks in Texas attracted the attention of the newspaper of record. "As Texas gears up to select biology textbooks for use by high school students over the next decade, the panel responsible for reviewing submissions from publishers has stirred controversy because a number of its members do not accept evolution and climate change," The New York Times (September 28, 2013) reported.

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09.24.2013

Seventy percent of Texans accept that global warming is happening, according to a new report (PDF) from the Yale Project on Climate Communication.

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Stand on the Congress Avenue Bridge in the evening, and you can watch millions of bats set forth across the Austin, Texas sky, freeing the city of mosquitoes. Walk north, and you’re surrounded by live music. Keep going until you reach the state capitol building, carved from native granite. Ponder the memorial to the Texans who died for the Confederacy. Cowboy hats, boots, and skinny jeans aren’t just for hipsters in this part of Austin. Pass the Chancery of the Diocese of Austin, and the statue of St. Francis commanding “Audite Verbum Dei”—“hear the word of God.” Half a block later, you’ve reached the headquarters of the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

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On September 17, the Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) held a hearing on new proposed instructional materials/textbooks for science and math classes, and the focus was clearly on the topic of evolution. Almost five dozen people spoke to the board, including NCSE’s Josh Rosenau.

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While listening on Tuesday to the Texas State Board of Education hearings on the adoption of science textbooks, I couldn’t help but think, “There they go again”, as citizens extolled that:

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This is what I told the Texas board of education just minutes ago. As a reminder, NCSE's ability to represent your voice in hearings depends on your donations.


Madame Chair, members of the board,

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Don’t mess with Textbooks!In 2009, when the Texas state board of education revised the state science education standards, creationists led by Don McLeroy (then the board chairman and a dentist, now only a dentist) pushed hard to add a standard requiring students to “analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning any data of sudden appearance, stasis,

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"Don't Mess With Textbooks!"I sent an email out to NCSE’s members in Texas about next Tuesday's hearing about textbooks before the Texas state board of education, but it occurs to me that some of you who read the blog and live in Texas may, inexplicably, not be members yet.

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I’ve already blogged about (and the joint TFN/NCSE press release detailed) how ideologically-driven textbook reviewers tried to undermine Texas textbooks’ coverage of evolution and climate change.

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