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A groundswell of support in Texas

When the Texas state board of education held its final public hearing on science textbook adoption on November 20, 2013, NCSE's Joshua Rosenau was on hand to present the board with a statement urging the adoption of the textbooks endorsed by no fewer than fifty-one scientific and educational societies.

Creationism's last stand in Texas?

As the Texas state board of education is preparing for its final public hearing on science textbook adoption, the Dallas Observer (November 14, 2013) published a marvelously detailed look at Texas antievolutionism past and present.

NSTA's advice to Texas

The executive director of the National Science Teachers Association called on the Texas state board of education to "reject any pressure to promote any nonscientific views in its textbooks or classrooms."

Publishers hold the line in Texas

"Materials submitted to the Texas Education Agency and examined by the Texas Freedom Network and university scientists show that publishers are resisting pressure to undermine instruction on evolution in their proposed new high school biology textbooks for public schools," according to a press release issued by the Texas Freedom Network on October 16, 2013.

Update from Texas

The creationists and climate change deniers reviewing biology textbooks in Texas attracted the attention of the newspaper of record. "As Texas gears up to select biology textbooks for use by high school students over the next decade, the panel responsible for reviewing submissions from publishers has stirred controversy because a number of its members do not accept evolution and climate change," The New York Times (September 28, 2013) reported.

Polling climate in Texas

Seventy percent of Texans accept that global warming is happening, according to a new report (PDF) from the Yale Project on Climate Communication.

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