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Respite in Oklahoma

No fewer than four antievolution bills were introduced in the Oklahoma legislature during its 2006 session: HB 2107 (encouraging the presentation of "the full range of scientific views" with regard to "biological or chemical origins of life"), HB 2526 (authorizing school districts to teach "intelligent design"), SB 1959 (encouraging the presentation of "the full range of scientific views"), and HCR 1043 (encouraging the state board of education and local school boards to ensure that students are able to "critically evaluate scientific theories including, but not limited to, the theory of evolution" with regard to "biological or chemical origins of life").

Oklahoma update


Oklahoma's House Bill 2107 was passed by the House by a vote of 77-10 on March 2, 2006. On March 15, it was referred to the Senate Committee on Appropriations, and then on March 21 to the Appropriations subcommittee on education, where it remains. The bill findins that "existing law does not expressly protect the right of teachers identified by the United States Supreme Court in Edwards v.

A fourth antievolution bill in Oklahoma


House Concurrent Resolution 1043 (RTF), introduced in the Oklahoma legislature on February 7, 2006, would, if enacted, encourage "the State Board of Education and local boards of education to revise the recommended academic curriculum content standards in science to ensure that, upon graduation, all students can accomplish the following: 1. Use of [sic] the scientific method to critically evaluate scientific theories including, but not limited to, the theory of evolution; and 2.

A third antievolution bill in Oklahoma


Senate Bill 1959 (RTF), introduced by Senator Daisy Lawler (D-District 24), is the third antievolution bill to be introduced in the Oklahoma legislature in 2006. If enacted, SB 1959 would provide:

A. Every teacher in a public school in this state shall be authorized to present information and allow classroom discussions that provide for views that may pertain to the full range of scientific views in any science course.

A second antievolution bill in Oklahoma


House Bill 2526 [Link broken] (RTF) is the second antievolution bill to be introduced in the Oklahoma House of Representatives in 2006, and like its predecessor HB 2107, it will presumably be considered after the legislature convenes on February 6, 2006.

Antievolution legislation on the horizon in Oklahoma


When the Oklahoma House of Representatives convenes on February 6, 2006, among the bills awaiting attention will be House Bill 2107 (RTF), dubbed the Academic Freedom Act. If enacted, HB 2107 would provide:

A. Every public school teacher in the State of Oklahoma, shall have the affirmative right and freedom to present scientific information pertaining to the full range of scientific views in any curricula or course of learning.

Creationist reversal in Tulsa


On July 7, 2005, the Tulsa, Oklahoma, Park Board voted 3-1 to reverse its June 7 decision to add a display depicting the Biblical account of creation at the Tulsa Zoo. Supporters of the display argued that the zoo already contains religious items, including a statue of the elephant-headed Hindu deity Ganesha outside the elephant enclosure and a globe carrying a Native American maxim, "The earth is our mother.

Tulsa Zoo to Add Creationism Exhibit


On June 7 the Park and Recreation Board of Tulsa, Oklahoma voted 3-1 to approve a display depicting the Biblical account of creation at the Tulsa Zoo. According to an Associated Press [Link broken] news report, the decision came after "more than two hours of public comment from a standing-room-only crowd."

Oklahoma textbook bill passes -- without disclaimer

On April 28, 2004, the Oklahoma House of Representatives passed House Bill 2194 -- a bill governing textbook purchase contracts -- by a vote of 96–0. Conspicuously absent from the bill as passed was the disclaimer provision added to the bill on February 23.

Evolution disclaimer bill passed in OK House

On February 24, House Bill 2194 was passed by the Oklahoma state House by a vote of 96-0. As originally introduced on February 2, HB 2194 required textbook publishers to furnish the State Textbook Committee with electronic files for the production of Braille versions of textbooks in conformance with U.S. Department of Education standards. On February 23, the bill was amended to include a new section that requires all textbooks that discuss evolution to include a long disclaimer.

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