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Oklahoma science standards adopted

On June 19, 2014, Oklahoma's governor Mary Fallin approved the state's adoption of a new set of science standards, according to US News & World Report (June 20, 2014), despite the objections of state legislators to their inclusion of climate science.

A last-minute victory in Oklahoma

When the Oklahoma legislature adjourned on May 23, 2014, the attempt to derail Oklahoma's new state science standards was stymied.

Oklahoma House votes to derail science standards

House Joint Resolution 1099, which would reject the state department of education's rules implementing Oklahoma's new science standards, was passed by the Oklahoma House of Representatives on a 55-31 vote on May 21, 2014. Part of the reason, the Tulsa World (May 22, 2014) explained, was that "[s]ome legislators ... objected to language they said appeared to encourage an 'agenda' concerning climate change."

Trouble over Oklahoma science standards

A committee in the Oklahoma House of Representatives voted to reject a new set of science standards, primarily over concerns about its treatment of climate change.

Two down in Oklahoma

Oklahoma's House Bill 1674 (PDF), which would, if enacted, have deprived administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," died in the Senate Education Committee on April 3, 2014, when a deadline for House bills to be passed by their Senate committees expired.

Antiscience bill passes the Oklahoma House

Oklahoma's House Bill 1674 (PDF), which would, if enacted, deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," passed the Oklahoma House of Representatives on a 79-6 vote on March 3, 2014. 

One down in Oklahoma

Oklahoma's Senate Bill 1765 (PDF), which would, if enacted, have deprived administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," died in the Senate Education Committee on February 24, 2014, when a deadline for senate bills to pass committee expired.

A second antiscience bill in Oklahoma

A bill in Oklahoma that would, if enacted, deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies" is back from the dead.

NABT opposes Oklahoma's antiscience bill

The National Association of Biology Teachers expressed its opposition to Oklahoma's Senate Bill 1765 (document), which, if enacted, would deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies."

AIBS opposes Oklahoma's antiscience bill

The American Institute of Biological Sciences expressed its opposition to Oklahoma's Senate Bill 1765 (document), which, if enacted, would deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies."

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