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More on the Ohio victory


The Ohio Board of Education voted 11-4 at its February 14, 2006, meeting to remove both the "Critical Analysis of Evolution" model lesson plan and the corresponding indicator -- which called for students to be able to "describe how scientists continue to investigate and critically analyze aspects of evolutionary theory" -- in the state standards.

Ohio's antievolution lesson plan removed


According to early reports [Link broken], the Ohio Board of Education voted 11-4 at its February 14, 2006, meeting to remove both the "Critical Analysis of Evolution" model lesson plan and the corresponding indicator in the state standards. The board's vote follows in the wake of a motion to remove the lesson plan during the board's January meeting, which failed 9-8.

Ohio's antievolution lesson plan under challenge


Although a proposal to remove the controversial "Critical Analysis of Evolution" lesson plan from the Ohio model science curriculum was narrowly defeated at the January meeting of the Ohio state board of education, the proposal is likely to be renewed at the board's February meeting, thanks to both a thinly disguised reproach from Ohio Governor Bob Taft (R) and a stinging rebuke from a large majority of the committee that originally helped to develop the standards.

An Open Letter to the Ohio Citizens for Science


by Eugenie C. Scott


Dear Ohio Citizens for Science,

Well, you did it.

State Board Adopts Standards, Rejects Intelligent Design

On December 10 the Ohio Board of Education unanimously voted to adopt new science standards which will guide public school curriculum and testing across the state. For the first time Ohio's standards will explicitly include the concept of evolution. Local supporters of science education consider the new standards a great improvement over the previous statewide guidelines, especially in their treatment of biological evolution.

Science Standards Move Forward

The Board of Education in Ohio is preparing to approve new state standards for public school science classes. Proposed standards were approved by the Standards Committee on October 14, 2002 and forwarded to the full board for consideration and adoption before the end of the year. The topic of evolution has been by far the most contentious element in the science standards throughout their development. Most Ohio scientists and teachers who have been following events consider the new standards a great improvement over previous treatments, especially regarding evolution.

Survey of Scientists Supports Evolution, Rejects "Intelligent Design"

A survey of Ohio university scientists shows that they overwhelmingly view "intelligent design" as a religious, not a scientific, concept. The survey was conducted by faculty at Case Western Reserve University and the University of Cincinnati, and results were announced at a press conference on October 10. Professor Joseph Koonce, Chair of the Department of Biology at Case Western, issued the following statement:

Ohio University Presidents Oppose Intelligent Design

In a letter to the Ohio Board of Education, 15 of Ohio's university presidents urged the board to preserve the integrity of the newly drafted science standards and oppose the inclusion of intelligent design. The letter is available in html and PDF formats. [Links have expired}

School District Supports "Intelligent Design"

The Board of Education of the Patrick Henry Local School District in Ohio has passed a motion supporting "the idea of intelligent design being included as appropriate in classroom discussions in addition to other scientific theories", according to an article in the April 16 issue of the Northwest Signal.

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